social media

IASH Twitter Takeover

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This week, I’m taking over the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities’ twitter feed (@IASH_Edinburgh) and I’ll be talking all about my postdoctoral research project, Collage before Modernism; the event that I’m co-organising, ‘Collage, Montage, Assemblage: Collected and Composite Forms, 1700-Present’; and my favourite collaged objects. Here’s the blog post I wrote introducing myself and the project before my takeover, and I hope you join in the conversation over there! 

 

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We the Humanities Curation, 24th-30th October

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Next week (24th-30th October), I’ll be guest curating the Humanities twitter account, @WetheHums. The rotation-curation project is designed to spread the diversity and value of the humanities. You can read my guest blog for the programme below:

October 24th – 30th: Freya Gowrley

Hi, I’m Freya, a tutor in Art History and Architectural History at the University of Edinburgh, who can usually be found tweeting about art, history, writing, and life as an early career researcher, @Freya_Gowrley. I was recently awarded my PhD in the History of Art from the University of Edinburgh, and I am a co-convenor of Edinburgh’s interdisciplinary Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series. I blog about my research at flgowrley.wordpress.com.

My research focuses on visual and material culture, design, and the decorative arts in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain and North America. Although my academic training is in art history, my research utilises perspectives from a variety of disciplines, including material culture studies, literary history, queer theory and gender studies, and the history of the emotions. My PhD thesis examined women’s engagements with domestic material culture in Britain between 1750 and 1830. I’m currently revising this work with an emphasis upon emotion, identity, and sociability. I’ve also begun work on a postdoctoral research project exploring the relationship between assemblage/collage and identity in Britain, America, and British India in the long nineteenth-century.

During my week curating We the Humanities, I hope to touch upon a number of topics. As a busy adjunct at the University of Edinburgh, my time is divided between preparing for various courses, applying for jobs and research grants, revising my PhD thesis for publication, and working on new research. Accordingly, I hope that my curation week will reflect my experiences of being an early career researcher, and the difficulties and challenges that can sometimes come with this. I also hope to discuss the processes of research, from the germination of an initial idea to the final published product. With #AcWriMo coming next month, I think it would also be profitable to discuss the role of social media in these processes, and the collective working practices that have arisen from it. Finally, with the recent news that the Art History A-Level will be axed, I also hope that the We the Humanities audience can continue to contribute to the vibrant discussion of why Art History, and the Humanities more broadly, matter.

I look forward to discussing these (and presumably many more) issues with you all next week.