seminars

Week in Review – 11 September

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mw66053.jpgSarah Forbes Bonetta (Sarah Davies) by Camille Silvy. Albumen print, 15 September 1862
3 1/4 in. x 2 1/4 in. (83 mm x 56 mm), National Portrait Gallery, London.

My object of the week is this albumen portrait of Sarah Forbes Bonetta, which was used to illustrate the National Portrait Gallery’s event In Conversation: Portraits of the Past: Researching Black Lives in the Archives. Dr Caroline Bressey and Dr Gemma Romain will discuss their experiences of researching images of black lives in archives, before reflecting upon the position of black historical research in Britain today.

This week, Goldsmiths, University of London announced that is was launching the world’s first postgraduate degree in Queer History, beginning in 2017. Perhaps even more excitingly for those of us working on queer culture, the university is also in discussions about the creation of a National Queer Archive.

I was excited to read about the Public Domain Review’s new Conjectures Series, a forum for ‘experiments with historical form and method’. Just like Storying the Past before it, such vehicles provoke important reflection on the discipline of history and what we as historians ‘do’. The first post in the series is Easter McCraney’s discussion of longing and the objects of history, which the editor describes as a ‘history poem’.

Also from the Public Domain Review, Ryan Feigenbaum’s essay Visions of Algae in Eighteenth-Century Botany provides a compelling consideration of the cultural import of a single species of algae: Conferva fontinalis

I greatly enjoyed reading the fascinating special issue of the open access Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture (15:2), on The Greek Slave by Hiram Powers: A Transatlantic Object, edited by Martina Droth & Michael Hatt. The issue discusses Powers’s sculpture in unparalleled detail, while simultaneously locating it within a number of its cultural contexts, thereby skilfully interweaving the sculpture’s micro and macro histories. I was also excited to see the CFP for the next issue of  MDCCC 1800 – the international online journal of nineteenth-century culture – on the ‘Arts on display: the 19th century international expositions‘. Each of these ventures serve to emphasise just how exciting publishing on nineteenth-century art is at the moment.

Other CFPs, conferences, journal special issues and articles that caught my eye this week included:

The CFP for the Heritages of Migration: Moving Stories, Objects and Home conference.

The programme for the Paul Mellon Centre’s upcoming conference Art in the British Country House: Collecting and Display.

The Auricular Style: Frames conference, which brings together research in fine & decorative art histories in order to shed light on the neglected Auricular style. The conference programme is available here.

The CFP for the Refiguring Romanticisms: Cross-Temporal Translations and Gothic Transgressions seminar.

The CFP for a forthcoming special issue of Eighteenth-Century Studies on ‘Empires’.

The William Wordsworth: Poetry, People and Place MOOC, run by Lancaster University in collaboration with Dove Cottage, Wordsworth’s home between 1799 to 1808.

The Storify for BAVS 2016 conference, Consuming (the) Victorians. 

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ECRS – 11 April

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Please join us for the sixth session in the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series. The session will present new work in eighteenth-century studies, with a focus on gender, politics, and visual and material culture. The session will feature Heather Carroll (University of Edinburgh), whose paper is titled ‘“What a fat nasty B—”: Satirical Prints of Female Political Rivals’, and Roseanne Waine (Bath Spa University), who will discuss ‘Eighteenth-Century Sartorial Culture: Politically Dressing the Body and Home’.

All are welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

Week in Review – 5 March

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Page from the commonplace book of Ellen Warter, granddaughter of Robert Southey, Coll-1559, Centre for Research Collections, University of Edinburgh.

Having spent many a recent free moment looking at commonplace books in the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Research Collections, the CFP for the fascinating-sounding Holding/Held by the Book conference struck a real chord with me. The conference considers ‘what it means to hold a book as well as the continuing hold the book has upon its readers’.

Other CFPs, TOCs, and posts that caught my eye this week included:

The call for submissions for Issue 4 of British Art Studies.  

The CFP for Life Writing and Film Biography in the Trans-Cultural Context. 

The Claiming Space: Women and Fashion symposium.

The CFP for Materiality and the Visual Arts Archive: Matter and Meaning.

The latest edition of Print Quarterly (March 2016).

The recent Notches blog series on sexually transmitted diseases, particularly Jill Briggs’ post on ‘Moral Panic and Syphilis in Jamaica‘, and Agnes Arnold Foster’s post ‘“The Unreasonable Indulgence of That Appetite”: Cancer as a Venereal Disease in the Nineteenth Century’.

 

ECRS – 29 February

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Please join us for the fifth session in the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series. The session will present new work in eighteenth-century studies, with an emphasis on statecraft and monarchy. Jonathan Singerton (University of Edinburgh), will present his paper ‘Thomas Jefferson and the Habsburg Monarchy: A Tale of Intrigue and Statecraft, 1783-1787’, and Aurore Chéry (University of Lyon 3) will present her paper,‘Redefining the Image of the King of France after the Seven Years War’.

All are welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

History of Art Research Seminar Series

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On 25 February I’ll be presenting research developed from my doctoral thesis on the relationship between needlework, painting and print culture as part of the University of Edinburgh’s History of Art Research Seminar Series. The title of the paper is ‘The Sister Arts: Needlework between Thread, Paint, and Print in Eighteenth-century Britain’, and further details can be found here.

The programme for the series as a whole can be found here.

Nineteenth-Century Research Seminars

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Screen Shot 2016-01-23 at 09.02.03.pngOn 26 May, I’ll be presenting new research on the commonplace books of Ellen Warter at the University of Edinburgh’s Nineteenth-Century Research Seminars. The title and abstract for the paper are below, and the programme for the series as a whole can be found here.

Object biographies: family histories and textual afterlives in the commonplace books of Ellen Warter

This paper will focus on two commonplace books made by Ellen Warter c.1885 (CRC, University of Edinburgh). Unlike many commonplace books, which tend to comprise transcriptions from a wide variety of texts by a range of different authors, over 300 pages of Warter’s texts refer to the history and literary productions of the Brontë family, including excerpts from the sisters’ writings, literary criticism relating to their publications, and information pertaining to their home in Haworth, North Yorkshire. Beyond her documentation of the Brontës, the practice of commonplacing was firmly intertwined with Warter’s own family history. Her father had edited the letters and commonplace books of his father-in-law, the Romantic poet Robert Southey, whilst her mother’s own commonplace book was published in 1861. For Warter then, commonplacing was not only an educative practice, but also an inherently familial one, with her compilation of ‘Brontëana’ consistent with the domestic material practices of her own literary family.

This paper will situate the books between other examples of ‘Brontëana’ and the ‘culture of commonplacing’ more broadly. Employing the framework of the object biography, the paper will consider Warter’s commonplace books as literary assemblage, tracing the constitutive elements of Warter’s commonplace books as they passed from one literary form into the next. At the same time, the paper will demonstrate how the books were inherently biographical objects, redolent with potent familial association, both of Warter’s own family, and that of the Brontës, and whose compilation created material and familial afterlives for its collected contents.

Programme for Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series 2016

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The programme for the University of Edinburgh’s forthcoming Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series has just been published on the project’s website. For more details, see here.

All seminars will be held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (time TBA). All welcome.

Monday 11th January 2016

Martha McGill, University of Edinburgh

‘Women and the Supernatural in Eighteenth-Century Scotland’

Dr Tim Stuart-Buttle, University of Cambridge

‘Hume, Locke…and Cicero? Debating the Moral Consequences of Religion’

    Monday 18th January 2016

Yuanyuan Liu, University of Edinburgh

‘Garden, City and Visuality: The Twenty-Four Views of Yangzhou in Yangzhou huafang lu (1797)

Carlos Portales, University of Edinburgh

‘Unity in Multiplicity towards the Eighteenth-Century: The Objective Formula of Beauty and its Transition to Subjectivity’

Monday 8th February 2016

Jessica Patterson, University of Manchester

‘The East India Company and Asian Despotism: Alexander Dow’s Civil Religion of India’

Dr Sundar Henny, University of Cambridge

‘(In)dependent Thinking: Isaak Iselin and the Scots’

Monday 22nd February 2016

Elisabeth Gernerd, University of Edinburgh

‘“Thrusts her arms into a muff”: The Sensory Position of Silk Muffs’

William Tullett, King’s College London

‘From Womb to Nose: Smell and the Performance of Gender in Eighteenth-Century England’

Monday 29th February 2016

Jonathan Singerton, University of Edinburgh

‘Thomas Jefferson and the Habsburg Monarchy: A Tale of Intrigue and Statecraft, 1783-1787’

Aurore Chéry, University of Lyon 3

‘Redefining the Image of the King of France after the Seven Years War’

Monday 21st March 2016

Kang-Po Chen, University of Edinburgh

‘The Archetypological Antithesis in William Blake’s America: A Prophecy (1793)’

Josh Dight, University of York

‘“Let sound morality, and genuine Christianity be goals from which you commence your political career”: Religion in the Courtroom and Trial of Thomas Muir’

Monday 11th April 2016

Heather Carroll, University of Edinburgh

‘“What a fat nasty B—”: Satirical Prints of Female Political Rivals’

Rosanne Waine, Bath Spa University

‘Eighteenth-Century Sartorial Culture: Politically Dressing the Body and Home’

Monday 25th April 2016

Alastair Noble, University of Edinburgh

‘“The Power of the Highlands”: Rivalries within the Whig Government and the Response to the ’45’

Dr Philip Loft, University College London

‘Making and Judging Law in a Composite State: Scottish Appeals to the House of Lords during the Eighteenth Century’

Monday 9th May 2016

Emily Knight, University of Oxford

‘The Death of a Child: Posthumous Portraits of Children in Eighteenth-Century Britain’

Sarah Burdett, University of York

‘“Weeping Mothers Shall Applaud”: Sarah Yates as Margaret of Anjou on the London Stage, 1797’

Monday 23rd May 2016

Dr Freya Gowrley, University of Edinburgh

‘“To preserve remembrance of having approached it”: Souvenirs at A la Ronde, Devon’

Dr Sally Holloway, Richmond, The American International University in London

‘Manufacturing Romance: The Economy of Courtship in Georgian England’