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Week in Review – 26 February

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Victorian hand calling card, private collection.

A slightly belated Week in Review post.

As I’ve noted before, Notches and the Age of Revolutions blogs are amongst my favourite academic blogs, and both present really interesting work in their respective fields. Of late, I particularly enjoyed Notches’ ‘Femme Histories Roundtable‘ series (parts I and II), as well as this amazing post on ‘Disembodied Desire‘, focusing on disembodied Victorian limbs, as seen in the above calling card.

In case you missed me excitedly sharing this on Twitter and Facebook, here’s a Hyperallergic article on Sotheby’s first-ever auction of erotic artworks. I was particularly enamoured with this incredible painted plywood table, a copy after those supposedly held in a secret erotic salon of Catherine the Great. For this and many other fascinating objects check out the auction catalogue.

I hugely enjoyed this article on the history of the colour red from The Paris Review, and was fascinated by this touching article on the epistolary correspondence of two men during the Second World War.

I was keen to watch this webinar on ‘Exploring the Africana Historic Postcard Collection‘, which discusses the African Section of the Library of Congress’ African and Middle Eastern Division’s collection of more than 2000 historical photographic postcards. The collection is an important visual record of Africa and its people during the historically intensive years of European colonialism from 1895 to 1960.

I also really enjoyed Pat Thomson’s thought-provoking post on developing institutional writing cultures. Thomson writes compellingly about the need for rebuilding such collective practices, which is something that strongly rings true for me as a participant in an academic writing group. Thomson’s post was written a few days before my fellow writing-group attendee Lucie Whitmore wrote a post on our writing group for the SGSAH Blog, and they had a lovely synchronicity in my mind. I’m also going to write an update post on my own progress with the writing group at some point soon, so watch this space.

Publications wise, the table of contents for the first issue of the Journal for Art Market Studies (Vol 1, No 1 (2017)), also caught my attention this week, as did this call for book proposals on Gender and Culture in the Romantic EraI was also really excited to see that Joanna Cohen’s book Luxurious Citizens: The Politics of Consumption in Nineteenth-Century America has now been published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. I’m sure this book will become an essential text for me as I expand my research to look at nineteenth-century American material culture.

 The following CFPs and conferences also caught my eye:

CFP: Consuming Gender, Assuming Gender one-day symposium (14 July 2017, Cardiff University)

CFP: Decor and Architecture (Lausanne, 16-17 Nov 17)

CFPFrench and English Rivalries in Dress and Textiles 1700-1914 (Paris, October 13-14, 2017)

CFP: “Emotions, Death and Dying” -PJHS (Winter 2017)

CFP: Queering the Transpacific: Asian American, American and Asian Queer Studies (March 31, 2017)

Finally, I noted with interest that there a number of vacancies on the Design History Society’s Board of Trustees, applications are due by mid-March.

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Week in Review – 11 December

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It’s been a few weeks since my last Week in Review, so this week is a bit of a bumper post of exhibitions, conferences, talks, articles, and CFPs – enjoy!

7.-lycidas.jpgCharlotte Brontë, Lycidas, Watercolour drawing, March 4, 1835. Copied from a print after painting by Henry Fuseli. Brontë Parsonage Museum.

Exhibitions 

First up, I want to highlight The Morgan Library & Museum’s exhibition Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will, which includes many examples of her juvenalia, as explored in this beautifully-written and illustrated article in The Paris Review.

Secondly, the Bard Graduate Center’s exhibition Charles Percier: Architecture and Design in an Age of Revolutions, which runs until February 5, 2017 and is the first large-scale exhibition to survey the French architect and interior designer. The Center recently hosted an accompanying symposium on Percier: Antiquity and Empire, which can be viewed on the centre’s youtube channel (which also features this rather good recent talk on Eames, by the hugely important design historian Pat Kirkham).

Thirdly, the forthcoming exhibition of Maria Sibylla Merian’s work, Maria Merian’s Butterflies, which will be at The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse from 17 March 2017. There will be an accompanying conference (Changing the Nature of Art and Science: Intersections with Maria Sibylla Merian) from 7-9 June 2017, in Amsterdam.

Conferences and CFPs

  • the CFP for the Handling, Placing and Looking at Photographs conference, Florence, 12-13 Oct 17
  • the CFP for Spaces of Remembering and Forgetting: An Interdisciplinary Conference 
  • the CFP for the The Art of Remembrance: Family, Art and Memory in New England
  • the Kitchens and Kitchen Gardens conference, 18 Jan 2017, London
  • the Women as art critics in 18thC conference 25 Feb 2017, Chawton House Library
  • the CFP for the Graduate Student Symposium – History of 19th-Century Art, New York, 26 Mar 17
  • the CFC for Age and Gender: Ageing in the Nineteenth Century, a Nineteenth Century Gender Studies special issue
Books and Journals 

I’m super excited for Heidi Thomson’s new book, Coleridge and the Romantic Newspaper: The Morning Post and the Road to Dejection, which will undoubtedly be an important resource for work on Romantic reading practices.

The past month has also featured a new issues from a number of innovative online journals and publishing outlets, including:

Blog Posts & Websites 

I don’t think I’ve spoken before about my love of the Age of Revolutions blog. This increased exponentially this month thanks to their multi-part series on alcohol in its revolutionary contexts and which featured posts on the ‘TRANS-IMPERIAL GEOGRAPHIES OF RUM: PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION‘, ‘THE FALSE HOPE OF CORN STALK RUM DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION‘, ‘INTOXICATION AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION‘, and ‘RUM, OATHS, AND SLAVE UPRISINGS IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION‘. The series has been a fascinating look at how the quotidian and the political intersect.

I’ve also been enjoying the Romantic Illustration Network‘s Image of the Month series. This time, it was Theodore von Holst’s ‘Frankenstein’ (1831), which is discussed at length in Ian Haywood’s fascinating post on the image.

Finally, I’ve found source lists such as Mark Carrigan’s post The Sociology of Trump: An Initial Reading List, or The New Inquiry’s post A Time for Treason, to be invaluable resources in the wake of November’s Presidential election.