eighteenth century

Week in Review – 11 March

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It’s been a while since I’ve done a Week in Review post, which is a shame as I find them a useful resource to look back on, particularly for noting historiographical trends. Today, I’m getting back in the habit with a quick post on the last week.


First up, the Public Domain Review featured this completely amazing Autograph Quilt, made by Adeline Harris Sears, c.1856–1863. This beautiful quilt, begun around 1856, features numerous autographs of people of note in nineteenth-century America, stitched together with a diverse selection of fabric scraps. During my Short-Term Research Fellowship at the Winterthur Museum and Library in August of last year, I spent some time examining their fascinating collection of autograph quilts, working on a case study for my project Collage before Modernism, so I was really excited to see this incredible specimen! For more photos and discussion, see the Public Domain Review site.

So many fascinating books caught my attention this week, including: Making Milk: The Past, Present and Future of Our Primary FoodNew Perspectives on the History of Facial Hair: Framing the Face; Griselda Pollock’s hugely anticipated Charlotte Salomon and the Theatre of MemoryExhibiting War: The Great War, Museums, and Memory in Britain, Canada, and Australia; and Forms of Empire: The Poetics of Victorian Sovereignty, which are now all firmly on my ‘to-read’ list. I was also hugely excited to learn about Robin Mitchell’s forthcoming book VÉNUS NOIRE: Black Women, Colonial Fantasies, and the Production of Gender & Race in France, 1804-1848, but it has yet to be released!

Finally, the following CFPs and conferences also peaked my interest:

CFP: Female Networks: Gendered Ways of Producing Knowledge (1750-1830)

CONF: Interior – inferior – in theory? (Berlin, 17-18 May 18)

CFP: Sexuality and Consumption – 18th Century to 21st Century; Vienna, Nov. 23/24

CFA: MA Archaeology of Death and Memory at the University of Chester



BOOK – Domestic Space in Britain, c.1750-1840: Materiality, Sociability and Emotion (Forthcoming, Bloomsbury Academic)

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I’m thrilled to announce that my book, Domestic Space in Late Georgian Britain: Materiality, Sociability and Emotion, c. 1750-1840 is now under contract with Bloomsbury Academic. I’ll be writing more posts about the book as it develops, but for now, I want to share the book’s draft blurb:

Between 1750 and 1840, the home took on unprecedented social and emotional significance. Focusing on the design, decoration, and reception of a range of elite and middling class homes from this period, Domestic Space in Late Georgian Britain demonstrates that the material culture of domestic life was central to how this function of the home was experienced, expressed, and understood at this time. Examining craft production and collection, gift exchange and written description, inheritance and loss, it carefully unpacks the material processes that made the home a focus for contemporaries’ social and emotional lives.

The first book on its subject, Domestic Space in Late Georgian Britain employs methodologies from both art history and material culture studies to examine previously unpublished interiors, spaces, texts, images, and objects. Utilising extensive archival research; visual, material, and textual analysis; and histories of emotion, sociability, and materiality, it sheds light on the decoration and reception of a broad array of domestic spaces. In so doing, it writes a new history of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century domestic space, establishing the materiality of the home as a crucial site for identity formation, social interaction, and emotional expression.

More soon!

BSECS Criticks Review – Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

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My review of the National Museum of Scotland’s Summer exhibition Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites is now up on the BSECS Criticks site. Read it here.

Conference: Slavery and the Scottish Country House

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On Friday I’m heading to the Slavery and the Scottish Country House event, a day workshop examining the connections between Scotland and slavery through the medium of the Scottish country house, hosted by the Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies at the University of Edinburgh. The programme is available here, and I’ll be sure to post a follow up blog on some of the conversations that arose from the conference.

MOOC – Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

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The University of Edinburgh and National Museums Scotland have recently teamed up on the forthcoming MOOC, Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites. The MOOC ties in with the Museum’s Jacobites exhibition (on now), and is led by a great team of scholars and curators, including my PhD supervisor, Professor Viccy Coltman. More details about the MOOC, including how to sign up, can be found here.

Programme: ISCH 2017 Conference ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’

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For the next few days I’ll be in Umeå, Sweden for the 2017 Annual Conference of the International Society for Cultural History. This year’s theme is ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’, and it promises to be a fascinating conference. I’m really excited to experience a range of approaches dealing with the emotions within cultural history, which I’ve no doubt will be hugely beneficial to the writing of my first book, on domestic material culture, sociabilities, and emotions. Tomorrow I’ll be speaking in Panel 8, ‘Materialising Love and Loss: Objects and Identity in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain’. The full programme is available here.

Award: IASH Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

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I’m thrilled to announce that from September 2017 until August 2018 I will be joining the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow. The fellowship is ten months long, but includes a two-month interruption for my fellowships at the Huntington and the Harry Ransom Center. The fellowship will allow me to conduct research for my postdoctoral research project, Collage before Modernism: Art, Intimacy and Identity in Britain and North America, 1700-1900. I’ll post more about my time at IASH as I take up the Fellowship.