art history

An ISCH bibliographies post

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Usually following a conference, I write some kind of post-conference report, where I reflect on the conversations and ideas that the conference provoked and discussed. For the recent ISCH conference on ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’, I want to do something a little different. Instead of the report format, I want to compile a bibliography of texts that I made note of speakers referencing. As I’m currently writing my monograph on the relationship between domestic material culture, sociabilities, and emotions between 1750-1850, this list has already been a hugely useful bibliography for my own research, but I had a sense as I was compiling it, that it might also be of use to a broader audience interested in state of the history of the emotions today.

This by no means represents a complete bibliography, as the conference had many parallel sessions, and I was only able to attend two days, but it will hopefully give a sense of some of the scholarship that presenters were using to construct their paper’s critical frameworks, and thereby a sense of how the history of the emotions is ‘being done’ at this present moment.

 

Day 1

Panel ‘Emotions in Research’

  • Emily Robinson, ‘Touching the void: Affective history and the impossible’, The Journal of Theory and Practice, 14:4 (2010), 503-520.
  • Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman (Rutgers University Press, 1987)
  • Joan W. Scott, ‘The Evidence of Experience’, Critical Inquiry, 17:4 (Summer, 1991), 773-797.
  • Andy Wood, The memory of the people: custom and popular senses of the past in early modern England (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013)

 

Keynote 1

Erin Sullivan, ‘Art and the Emotional Historian’

Firstly, some relevant publications by Sullivan:

  • Beyond Melancholy: Sadness and Selfhood in Renaissance England (Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • (edited, with Richard Meek) The Renaissance of Emotion: Understanding Affect in Early Modern Literature and Culture (Manchester University Press, 2015)
  • (with Susan Brock and Greg Wells) ‘The Melancholy Earl: Sir William Herbert in the Medical Cases Notes of Dr Barker of Shrewsbury’, Notes and Queries 63:4 (2016)
  • ‘Melancholy’, in Early Modern Emotions: An Introduction, ed. Susan Broomhall (Routledge, 2017)
  • ‘Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay’, in Cahiers Élisabéthains 87 (2015)
  • ‘The History of the Emotions: Past, Present, Future’, Cultural History 2:1 (2013)
  • ‘”The Watchful Spirit”: Religious Anxieties toward Sleep in the Notebooks of Nehemiah Wallington’, Cultural History 1:1 (2012) – winner of the 2011 International Society for Cultural History Essay Prize
  • ‘A Disease unto Death: Sadness in the Time of Shakespeare’, in Emotions and Health, 1200-1700, ed. by Elena Carrera, Brill (Brill, 2013)

 

  • Peter Burke, ‘Is there a Cultural History of the Emotions?’ in Penelope Gouk and Helen Hills (eds.), Representing Emotions (Aldershot, 2005)
  • William M. Reddy, The Making of Romantic Love: Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia, and Japan, 900-1200 CE. (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2012)
  • Thomas Dixon, Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in Tears (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Johan Huizinga, The Waning of the Middle Ages (1919)
  • Reddy, William M. “Against Constructionism: The Historical Ethnography of Emotions.” Current Anthropology 38 (1997), 327-351.
  • Rosenwein, Barbara H. “Worrying about Emotions in History.” The American Historical Review (2002).
  • Peter N. Stearns and Carol Z. Stearns, ‘Emotionology: Clarifying the History of Emotions and Emotional Standards’, The American Historical Review, 90:4 (October, 1985), 813-836.
  • Keith Oatley, Emotions: A Brief History (Wiley, 2004)
  • Stephanie Trigg, Shame and Honor: A Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)
  • http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/25/martha-nussbaums-moral-philosophies
  • Melissa Greg, The Affect Theory Reader (Duke University Press, 2010)
  • Susan J. MattPeter N. Stearns, Doing Emotions History (University of Illinois Press, 2013)

 

Panel ‘Materialising Love and Loss: Objects and Identity in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain’

  • Marcia Pointon, ‘”Surrounded with Brilliants”: Miniature Portraits in Eighteenth-Century England, The Art Bulletin, 83:1 (March, 2001), 48-71
  • Annette Weiner, Inalienable Possessions: The Paradox of Keeping-While-Giving (1992)
  • Anna Moran, Sorcha O’Brien, Love Objects: Emotion, Design and Material Culture (Bloomsbury, 2014)
  • Diana O’hara, ‘The Language of Tokens and the Making of Marriage’, Rural History, 3:1 (1992), 1-40
  • Diana O’hara, Courtship and constraint: Rethinking the making of marriage in Tudor England (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002)
  • Neil McKendrickJohn BrewerJohn Harold Plumb, The birth of a consumer societythe commercialization of eighteenth-century England (Europa Publications, 1982) 
  • John Brewer and Roy Porter, eds. Consumption and the World of Goods (Routledge, 1993)
  • Anne Gerritsen, Giorgio Riello, eds. The Global Lives of ThingsThe Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World (Routledge, 2015) 
  • Cynthia Wall, The Prose of Things: Transformations of Description in the Eighteenth Century (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2006)
  • Frank Trentmann, Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First, (London: Allen Lane/Penguin; New York: HarperCollins 2016)
  • Michael Brown, ‘Cold Steel, Weak Flesh’: Mechanism, Masculinity and the Anxieties of Late Victorian Empire’, CULTURAL & SOCIAL HISTORY, 14: 2 (2017) 
  • Michael Brown, ‘Surgery and Emotion: The Era Before Anaesthesia’, The Palgrave Handbook of the History of Surgery. T. Schlich ed. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
  • Matthew McCormack, Embodying the Militia in Georgian England (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Sarah Ahmed, The Cultural Politics of Emotion (Routledge, 2007)
  • Philip Shaw, Suffering and Sentiment in Romantic Military Art (Ashgate, 2013)
  • Holly Furneaux, and Prichard, S. ‘Contested objects: curating soldier art. Museum & Society 13:4 (2015), 447-461.
  • Holly Furneaux, Military men of feeling: masculinity, emotion and tactility in the Crimean War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015)

 

Day 2

Keynote 2

Barbara H. Rosenwein, ‘Affect Theory’s Convergences and Conundrums’

Relevant publications by Rosenwein:

  • Anger’s Past: The Social Uses of an Emotion in the Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 1998)
  • Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 2006)
  • Generations of Feeling: A History of Emotions 600-1700  (Cambridge University Press, 2016)
  • “Problems and Methods in the History of Emotions,” Passions in Context: Journal of the History and Philosophy of the Emotions, 1:1 (2010)

 

  • Lisa Feldman Barrett, How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain (Pan Macmillan2017)
  • Magda Arnold, Emotion and personality (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960)
  • Bruce R. Smith, The Key of Green: PASSION AND PERCEPTION IN RENAISSANCE CULTURE (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008)
  • Brian Massumi, Politics of Affect (John Wiley & Sons2015)
  • Nicole Eustace, Passion Is the GaleEmotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (UNC Press Books, 2012)
  • Nicole Eustace, 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)

 

Panel: The affective turn in the history of the East-West encounter

  • Elsbeth Locher-Scholten, Women and the Colonial StateEssays on Gender and Modernity in the Netherlands Indies, 1900-1942 (Amsterdam University Press, 2000)
  • Kartini (Raden Adjeng), KartiniThe Complete Writings 1898-1904 (Monash University Publishing, 2014) 

 

Panel: Motherhood, medicine and the emotions

  • Laura Gowing, Common bodies : women, touch and power in seventeenth-century England (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2002)
  • Laura Gowing, Gender Relations in Early Modern England (Pearson Longman, 2012)
  • Adrian Wilson, ‘THE PERILS OF EARLY MODERN PROCREATION: CHILDBIRTH WITH OR WITHOUT FEAR?’ Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 16 (1993), 1–19

MOOC – Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

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The University of Edinburgh and National Museums Scotland have recently teamed up on the forthcoming MOOC, Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites. The MOOC ties in with the Museum’s Jacobites exhibition (on now), and is led by a great team of scholars and curators, including my PhD supervisor, Professor Viccy Coltman. More details about the MOOC, including how to sign up, can be found here.

Lewis Walpole Library Research Travel Grant Report

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Thanks to a 2016-17 Travel Grant from the Lewis Walpole Library (taken in April 2017) I was able to conduct crucial primary research for two monograph projects: the first, which develops research from my PhD thesis to think about the social and emotional life of the home in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the second, my postdoctoral project, which is provisionally titled Collage before Modernism: Art, Intimacy and Identity in Britain and North America, 1700-1900. The book will be the first study to focus on the complex relationship between emotion, identity, and the production of collage during this period, and will explore how the asking how its creation reflected and constructed the interests, intimacies, and identities of its makers.

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Specifically, a Lewis Walpole Library Travel Grant enabled me to conduct research for chapters for each project, which variously examine the reception and production of Strawberry Hill in scrapbooks and extra-illustrated texts made within the circle of Horace Walpole, Anne Seymour Damer, and Mary and Agnes Berry; and the familial production of commonplace books and albums in the eighteenth and nineteenth-centuries. For the first of these chapters, I consulted the notebooks, scrapbooks, and correspondence of Anne Seymour Damer, Mary Berry, Agnes Berry, and Horace Walpole, as well as a number of extra-illustrated volumes of Walpole’s A Description of the Villa of Horace Walpole. Examining these manuscript volumes and published texts not only allowed me to unpack and trace the various relationships between this social group, but also to think about how these relationships were constructed and reflected in these collaged objects. I was also able to consult a range of supporting literature, such as the ‘Astley Collection of Strawberry Hill Pieces’, and the ‘Rarities from Strawberry Hill’, which allowed me to place these volumes within a broader context of literary and material production coming from, or centring on, Strawberry Hill. Visiting the library also gave me the chance to examine the famous Beauclerk Cabinet (1783-4), a fascinating piece of furniture, which, like the extra-illustrated copies of the Description, demonstrates how the very fabric of Strawberry Hill was shaped by collaborative and creative endeavour.

For the second of the chapters, I examined the library’s collections of albums and commonplace books, focusing on those that were familially produced, or which particularly pertained to the expression of emotion. The latter included LWL MSS Vol. 18, a manuscript collection of poems, elegies, verses on the subjects of solitude, death, and the nature of humanity, whose carefully selected inclusions will allow me to consider how commonplace books’ excerpted texts reflect and construct contemporaries’ emotional lives during this period. I also looked at the Library’s recent acquisition, LWL MSS Vol. 223, a boxed series of sixty-five manuscript notecards that functions like a commonplace book, bearing several hands and thereby attesting to the communal nature of its production.

I also spent time looking at the Library’s broader collection of commonplace books and albums. which allowed me to conduct important comparative research. Some of these were particularly revealing for thinking through some of the technologies of commonplacing during this period, especially in terms of how contemporaries themselves conceived of these practices. For example, Sir Henry Edward Bunbury’s commonplace book, ‘Omnium gatherum’, comprising original verse, extracts, costume, epigrams, bon mots, traits (LWL MSS File 81), features a highly reflexive, hand-drawn title page, depicting the collector of the volume’s inclusions standing over a pile of rocks labelled with words that evoke the manuscript’s contents.

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Spending time looking at these manuscripts in person was invaluable to my research, as it allowed me to explore issues of materiality, and to think about how these objects were constructed, viewed, and handled at the time that they were made. Going forward, I’ll spend time reviewing and reflecting upon the photographs and notes taken at the Library, researching the manuscripts’ various inclusions further and thinking about the volumes in relation to research conducted at other institutions, such as Yale Center for British Art. I’m hugely excited to utilise my findings as I finish my first book and continue the research into my second, and would like to thank the Lewis Walpole Library for making this research possible.

Award: IASH Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

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I’m thrilled to announce that from September 2017 until August 2018 I will be joining the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow. The fellowship is ten months long, but includes a two-month interruption for my fellowships at the Huntington and the Harry Ransom Center. The fellowship will allow me to conduct research for my postdoctoral research project, Collage before Modernism: Art, Intimacy and Identity in Britain and North America, 1700-1900. I’ll post more about my time at IASH as I take up the Fellowship.

Absent Presences at Strawberry Hill – thoughts from the Lewis Walpole Library

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It’s the first day of my two-week research visit to the Lewis Walpole Library, and I’ve just finished looking through the anonymous volume Rarities from Strawberry Hill, made sometime around the 1890s. The volume (essentially a scrapbook) once brought together letters from Walpole’s voluminous correspondence, printed portraits, clippings, playbills, bookplates (including the above example, Anne Damer’s, based on a design by her close friend Agnes Berry) a lock of hair, and even two miniature portraits, who are conspicuous in their absence from the volume, leaving two holes where they were once fitted (pictured below). Along with a number of other objects from the book – including various letters and the aforementioned lock of hair – the miniatures have been removed and preserved elsewhere: in the case of miniatures, these are now on display at Strawberry Hill itself, where they now tell a different narrative in a different setting.

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This dialogue of absence and presence, and how these states intersect with how we construct the history of the eighteenth century, reminded me of an earlier post I made here, regarding Strawberry Hill itself. When visiting the house last Summer, I bemoaned the absence of any kind of narrative regarding Walpole’s queerness, despite the prevalence of this within scholarship on Walpole and his friendships. I hope that the chapter I’m researching here (on Anne Damer’s inheritance of Strawberry Hill and queer heirlooming) at the Lewis Walpole Library can meaningfully contribute to these conversations, revealing some of those things that are sorely absent from the scholarship on Walpole.

Award – Harry Ransom Center Short Term Research Fellowship in the Humanities

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I’m thrilled to have been awarded a Harry Ransom Center Short Term Research Fellowship in the Humanities to conduct research on my postdoctoral research project on collage before modernism. The Harry Ransom Center has a wealth of collections relevant to the project, including the infamous (but rather unstudied) Durenstein! Blood Book, created by John Bingley Garland in 1854 and given to his daughter shortly after. The ‘Blood Book’ is just one object I’ll be looking at during my month-long research fellowship at the Center, which I’ll be taking in 2018.

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Week in Review – 19 March

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33005859916_69ac826dc4_b.jpgRobert Dighton, The Macaroni Painter, or Billy Dimple sitting for his Picture, 1772. British Museum, London.

First up, Dominic Janes’ post, ‘A Queer Taste for Macaroni‘, on the Public Domain Review. I recently had an article accepted for a special issue of Aphra Behn Online: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830 that explores the concept of “camp” with regards to eighteenth-century studies. My article will locate macaronism within a visual and ironic rhetoric of campness, and Janes’ new book Oscar Wilde Prefigured: Queer Fashioning and British Caricature, 1750-1900 is an essential resource for this work. 

Secondly, I was hugely excited to read about the National Gallery of Victoria’s upcoming exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800, which draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe.

I also enjoyed reading this review of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge’s exhibition Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy, which the role of domestic objects in sustaining and inspiring faith.

I was also intrigued to read: this post from Notches Blog on ‘Porno Chic and the Sex Wars: A Roundtable on the Politics of Sexual Representations in the 1970s‘; and this fascinating article on the spiritualist artist Hima af Klint.

I’ve got several multi-media picks this week: first, this episode of The Why Factor on using our hands; this episode of the Art Detective Podcast on Tipu’s Tiger – with Sona Datta; and finally, this video of Mary Beard’s lecture, Women in Power.

The following CFPs and conferences also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Fashion, Dress, and Post-Postmodernism (September 20, 2017)

CFP: Vistas. 19th Century Studies (Philadelphia, 15-17 Mar 18)

CONF: Rejection & Recovery in the History of Art & Architecture (Boston, 24-25 Mar 17)

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

CFP: Art of Power: The 3rd Earl of Bute, Politics and Collecting in Enlightenment Britain (2nd Oct 2017 – 4th Oct 2017)

WORKSHOP: Approaching Inner Lives: Thinking, Feeling, Believing, 1300-1900 (Tuesday 28 March 2017)