Week in Review

Week in Review – 6 January

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The Week in Review is back! It is, I promise. In fact, one of my New Year’s Resolutions is to keep it going. So here’s my picks from the first week of 2019!

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Articles

With Marie Kondo back in the news (let’s not get into a heated debate about what to do with your books though), I thought I’d share this great piece on her methods from 2016. Kondo is fascinating for me as a scholar of the relationship between emotions and objects, and this is a compelling examination of the phenomenon associated with her.

This nice little piece from the Guardian on the first exhibition detailing some LGBTQ+ histories of video games at Berlin’s Schwules Museum.

This great post, on ‘“so a word to the wise’: reassessing the role of the upper-class Irish father in nineteenth-century childrearing’, on the Perceptions of Pregnancy blog.

 

Events

As ever, there’s lots of great things coming up. Here’s a few faves:

PMC Doctoral & Early Career Researchers Networks: Discussing Landscape 

Romance, Intimacy and Love: An Inclusive Interdisciplinary Conference

CFP: Histories of Sexuality and Erudition: Institutions, Texts, Practices (Princeton, May 10-11, 2019)

Mobilities and Materialities: Building Bridges Between Past and Future

CFP: Victorian Visions

Pretty Ugly: Early Modern Beauty, 1400-1800

Embroidered with Dust and Mortar: Women and Architecture, 1660–1830
2019 Georgian Group Symposium  [I particularly love the title of this one]

 

Resources 

This great new blog on Early Modern female book ownership.

The Janet Arnold Awards for scholars working on the history of dress. £350 to £5,000, deadline 15 Jan.

So just a short one this week, but expect some longer posts once the year properly gets going…

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Week in Review – 11 March

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It’s been a while since I’ve done a Week in Review post, which is a shame as I find them a useful resource to look back on, particularly for noting historiographical trends. Today, I’m getting back in the habit with a quick post on the last week.

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First up, the Public Domain Review featured this completely amazing Autograph Quilt, made by Adeline Harris Sears, c.1856–1863. This beautiful quilt, begun around 1856, features numerous autographs of people of note in nineteenth-century America, stitched together with a diverse selection of fabric scraps. During my Short-Term Research Fellowship at the Winterthur Museum and Library in August of last year, I spent some time examining their fascinating collection of autograph quilts, working on a case study for my project Collage before Modernism, so I was really excited to see this incredible specimen! For more photos and discussion, see the Public Domain Review site.

So many fascinating books caught my attention this week, including: Making Milk: The Past, Present and Future of Our Primary FoodNew Perspectives on the History of Facial Hair: Framing the Face; Griselda Pollock’s hugely anticipated Charlotte Salomon and the Theatre of MemoryExhibiting War: The Great War, Museums, and Memory in Britain, Canada, and Australia; and Forms of Empire: The Poetics of Victorian Sovereignty, which are now all firmly on my ‘to-read’ list. I was also hugely excited to learn about Robin Mitchell’s forthcoming book VÉNUS NOIRE: Black Women, Colonial Fantasies, and the Production of Gender & Race in France, 1804-1848, but it has yet to be released!

Finally, the following CFPs and conferences also peaked my interest:

CFP: Female Networks: Gendered Ways of Producing Knowledge (1750-1830)

CONF: Interior – inferior – in theory? (Berlin, 17-18 May 18)

CFP: Sexuality and Consumption – 18th Century to 21st Century; Vienna, Nov. 23/24

CFA: MA Archaeology of Death and Memory at the University of Chester

 

Week in Review – 27 August

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tumblr_inline_otz2m6og971uxtbbs_1280.jpgHatfield Family Bible, Case folio BS185 1838.N4, Newberry Library

A round up of CFPs, conferences, and posts from the last week (…or so).

First up: a bit of self promo. There’s still a little while left before the deadline for our call for articles for the special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender StudiesMaking Masculinity: Craft, Gender, and Material Production in the Long Nineteenth Century. We’d love to see articles from you! The full CFA is available here.

Similarly, Cole Collins and I are really excited to read your collage-related abstracts for our upcoming conference Collage, Montage, Assemblage: Collected and Composite Forms, 1700-Present. The CFP is available here, and we even wrote a post on our favourite scholarly works on collage here.

Next, this post from the Newberry’s blog, The Rite Stuff, examining ‘Family History in a Bible’. I really enjoy the object biography approach taken to the object.

The programmes for the Enlightened Princesses conference, the vcologies 2 working group annual meeting, and the Alma-Tadema: Antiquity at Home and on Screen conference

CFPs that caught my eye this week included:

CFP – Passing: Fashion in American Cities

CFP – Interior Provocations – Interiors without Architecture

CFP – Making Things Modular

CFP – Fire and Water: Entangled Histories of Empire and Science in the Early Modern Americas

CFP – Remarkable Things: The Agency of Objecthood and The Power of Materiality

CFP – Creative Pedagogies: Approaches to the Commonplace Book

CFP – C19: Acts of Consumption: Performance, Bodies, Culture

CFP – Crafting an Enlightened World: Patronage & Pioneers

Today marks the beginning of my last week of my Short-Term Research Fellowship at the Winterthur Museum, so once the craziness of the summer has passed, I’ll be back to regular Week in Review posts, so watch this space!

Week in Review – 23 July

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My object of the week is this INCREDIBLE Album of Seaweed Pictures from 1848, now held at the Brooklyn Museum. The album was made as a gift for Augustus Graham, a member of the first board of directors of the Brooklyn Apprentice’s Library, later to become the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences and the Brooklyn Museum.

I was really sorry to miss the Beyond Between Men symposium, so I hugely enjoyed reading Rachel E. Moss’s round-up blog post about the event. You can read it here.

The BAVS Talks 2017 videos are now all up online. You can take a look here.

CFP: CAA 2018 – Imperial Islands: Vision and Experience in the American Empire after 1898

Although the CFP deadline for the Home Comforts: The physical and emotional meanings of home in Europe, 1650-1900 conference has now passed, I still wanted to bring attention to this fascinating-sounding conference, which intersects interestingly with my current book project.

The edited volume Feminism and Art History Now: Radical Critiques of Theory and Practice, is out now from I B Tauris, and will be an essential resource for anyone using feminist theory in their art historical writing.

NOTCHES is seeking contributions for an upcoming and continuing series on transgender histories. See the CFP for full details, deadline September 15, 2017.

Issue 6 (Summer 2017) of British Art Studies is now live. The special issue focuses on Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600–1500, and examines lots of fascinating objects at length and in depth.

Other conferences, CFPs, etc that caught my eye this week included:

  • CONF: Re/presenting the Body (Glasgow, 6-7 Jul 17)
  • CFP: Jewellery Matters (Amsterdam, 16-17 Nov 17)
  • CONF: Film|Bild|Emotion (Regensburg, 20-21 Jul 18)
  • CFP: Collecting Medieval Sculpture (Paris, 23-24 Nov 17)
  • CONF: Nineteenth-Century Art in Islamic Countries (Vienna, 6-9
    Jul 17)
  • CFP: Temporary and Mobile Domesticities, 1600 to the present – 10.10.2017, London
  • CFC: Special Issue of The History of the Family
  • CFP: Issue: Material and Visual Cultures of Religion in the American South

Week in Review – 5 March

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Zoffany.jpgQueen Charlotte (detail; 1771), Johan Joseph Zoffany. Royal Collection Trust, UK. 

First up this week, this Apollo Magazine review of Yale Centre for British Art‘s exhibition Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte and the Shaping of the Modern World, which runs until April 30th (frustratingly, just one day before I arrive there as a visiting scholar!).

Secondly, I read Alice Kelly’s articleHow to make writing in the humanities less lonely‘, which discusses TORCH’s writing group with interest, as the group was a crucial source of inspiration for our own version in Edinburgh.

I thoroughly enjoyed this post from the National Museum of Scotland on Owen Jones’ Grammar of Ornament, which is an important object within the museum’s newly curated art and design galleries.

The Storifys for each day of the three days of the War Through Other Stuff conference are now available here. I’ll be posting some thoughts from the conference in an upcoming blog post next week.

I was also captivated by this Victoria and Albert Museum videoGarnitures: Vase Sets from National Trust Houses‘, which examines rare surviving examples of vase sets and ceramic ornaments from National Trust houses being displayed on furniture and in period rooms at the V&A.

I was excited to see that the special inaugural issue of the Journal of Romanticism, on Romanticism and mysticism, is now available for purchase.

Finally, I saw a reminder this week that all of the University of Cambridge Things sessions are available as podcasts online – I must catch up asap!

The following CFPs, conferences and CFAs also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait, 14th – 18th Centuries (1-2 Dec 17)

CFP: Material Histories of Time: Objects and Practices, 14th-18th centuries (La Chaux-de-Fonds, Musée international d’horlogerie, November 30 – December 1, 2017)

CFP: “Hawthorne and Things” MLA 2018

CONF: Dress and Diplomacy (Copenhagen, 22 Mar 17)

CFP: AAH Summer Symposium: Re/presenting the Body (Glasgow,
6-7 Jul 17)

CFP: Collections – Scholars – Interpretations (Tbilisi, 2-3
May 17)

CONF: Graduate Student Symposium – History of 19th-Century Art (New York, 26 Mar 17)

CFP: Special issue of Southern Cultures: Southern Things (Material Culture)

CFA: The Pre-Raphaelites and Antiquity (Special Issue Open Cultural Studies)

CFA: On Uses of Black Camp (Special Issue Open Cultural Studies)

CFA: Materiality, Objects and Objecthood (Special Issue Open Cultural Studies)

Week in Review – 26 February

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Victorian hand calling card, private collection.

A slightly belated Week in Review post.

As I’ve noted before, Notches and the Age of Revolutions blogs are amongst my favourite academic blogs, and both present really interesting work in their respective fields. Of late, I particularly enjoyed Notches’ ‘Femme Histories Roundtable‘ series (parts I and II), as well as this amazing post on ‘Disembodied Desire‘, focusing on disembodied Victorian limbs, as seen in the above calling card.

In case you missed me excitedly sharing this on Twitter and Facebook, here’s a Hyperallergic article on Sotheby’s first-ever auction of erotic artworks. I was particularly enamoured with this incredible painted plywood table, a copy after those supposedly held in a secret erotic salon of Catherine the Great. For this and many other fascinating objects check out the auction catalogue.

I hugely enjoyed this article on the history of the colour red from The Paris Review, and was fascinated by this touching article on the epistolary correspondence of two men during the Second World War.

I was keen to watch this webinar on ‘Exploring the Africana Historic Postcard Collection‘, which discusses the African Section of the Library of Congress’ African and Middle Eastern Division’s collection of more than 2000 historical photographic postcards. The collection is an important visual record of Africa and its people during the historically intensive years of European colonialism from 1895 to 1960.

I also really enjoyed Pat Thomson’s thought-provoking post on developing institutional writing cultures. Thomson writes compellingly about the need for rebuilding such collective practices, which is something that strongly rings true for me as a participant in an academic writing group. Thomson’s post was written a few days before my fellow writing-group attendee Lucie Whitmore wrote a post on our writing group for the SGSAH Blog, and they had a lovely synchronicity in my mind. I’m also going to write an update post on my own progress with the writing group at some point soon, so watch this space.

Publications wise, the table of contents for the first issue of the Journal for Art Market Studies (Vol 1, No 1 (2017)), also caught my attention this week, as did this call for book proposals on Gender and Culture in the Romantic EraI was also really excited to see that Joanna Cohen’s book Luxurious Citizens: The Politics of Consumption in Nineteenth-Century America has now been published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. I’m sure this book will become an essential text for me as I expand my research to look at nineteenth-century American material culture.

 The following CFPs and conferences also caught my eye:

CFP: Consuming Gender, Assuming Gender one-day symposium (14 July 2017, Cardiff University)

CFP: Decor and Architecture (Lausanne, 16-17 Nov 17)

CFPFrench and English Rivalries in Dress and Textiles 1700-1914 (Paris, October 13-14, 2017)

CFP: “Emotions, Death and Dying” -PJHS (Winter 2017)

CFP: Queering the Transpacific: Asian American, American and Asian Queer Studies (March 31, 2017)

Finally, I noted with interest that there a number of vacancies on the Design History Society’s Board of Trustees, applications are due by mid-March.

Week in Review – 19 February

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John Richard Coke Smyth, Elizabeth, Lady Eastlake. Watercolour
4 3/4 in. x 4 1/4 in. (121 mm x 108 mm), National Portrait Gallery, London.

First up, the conference programme for the Writing Art: Women Writers as Art Critics in the Long Eighteenth Century conference. The conference intersects with a number of my projects, firstly an article I’m currently writing on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women travel writers and the narratives they tell through objects, and secondly, #WaysofSheing, a twitter-based project that aims to highlight and celebrate the contributions of female art historians. The conference features presentations on Elizabeth, Lady Eastlake (pictured above), Germaine de Staël, and the travel writer Maria Graham.

I enjoyed Sarah Read’s article ‘‘Gushing Out Blood’: Defloration and Menstruation in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure‘, from a recent edition of the Journal of Medical Humanities.  In the article Read explores how Cleland ‘repeatedly depicts and eroticises the act of defloration’ in his erotic 1740s novel Fanny Hill. 

Deborah Cohen’s The Atlantic article ‘Before Straight and Gay: The discreet, disorienting passions of the Victorian era‘, which begins with a microcosmic examination of the queer histories of the Benson family, is a fascinating read.

I was fascinated by this BBC News video, on the forgotten Victorian botanical painter Marianne North.

I also really enjoyed this revealing interview with April Haynes, author of Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-Century America in a recent post on the Notches blog.

As ever, the Public Domain Review has been a wonderful source of articles and objects. I particularly enjoyed this recent essay by Yvonne Seale on nineteenth-century genealogy.

The following CFPs and conferences also caught my attention:

CONF: Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies (June 17, 2017)

CFP: Anonymity Unmasked: Identity, Agency, Responsibility (September 13-15, 2017)

CFP: Death and the Maiden (July 21-24, 2017)

CFP: Romanticism and Popular Culture (November 3-5, 2017)