Seminars

ECRS – 12 April

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Please join us for the next session of this year‘s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series at the University of Edinburgh. The session will present new work on eighteenth-century material culture and will feature Hannah Lund (University of Edinburgh) whose presentation is titled ‘Enthroned: The Sitter’s Chair of Sir Joshua Reynolds 1760-1879’, and Suchitra Choudhury (University of Glasgow), on ‘Fashion and Textiles: A Postcolonial Reading of Sir Walter Scott’.

All welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

ECRS – 15 March

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Please join us for the next session of this year‘s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series at the University of Edinburgh. The session will present new work on Enlightenment Europe, and will feature William Swain (University of Edinburgh), who will be speaking on ‘Adam Ferguson, Freidrich von Gentz, and the decline of the Martial Spirit’, and John Stone (Universitat de Barcelona), whose paper is entitled ‘The Cultural Work of the Royal Scots College (Valladolid), 1770-1808: Cosmopolitanism, Diaspora, the ‘National Feeling’ and Library Formation’.

All welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

ECRS – 1 March

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Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 20.47.18Please join us for the next session of this year‘s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series at the University of Edinburgh. The session will present new work on eighteenth-century music, and will feature Elizabeth Ford (University of Glasgow ), who will be speaking on ‘“I can think of nothing but that flute”: General John Reid (1721-1807)’, and Alice Little (University of Oxford), whose paper is entitled ‘Categorising ‘national music’ in eighteenth-century Oxford’.

All welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

ECRS – 25 January

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Please join us for the first session of this year‘s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series at the University of Edinburgh. The session will present new work on eighteenth-century religion, and will feature Ben Rogers (University of Edinburgh) whose presentation is entitled ‘‘An Unexpected Solution or a Political Imposition?’: Scottish Episcopalian Toleration, 1702-1712’, and Carys Brown (University of Cambridge), who will be speaking on ‘‘A dissembling Harlot for a leacherous wolf’: sexual reputation and religious coexistence in England, c.1689-1750′.

All welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

CFP for Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar Series 2017

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Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 18.21.55The CFP for next year’s incarnation of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth Century Research Seminar Series is now live. Read it on the ECRS website or below.

The Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar (ECRS) series invites proposals for twenty-minute papers from postgraduate and early-career researchers addressing any aspect of eighteenth-century history, culture, literature, education, art, music, geography, religion, science, and philosophy. The seminar series seeks to provide a regular inter-disciplinary forum for postgraduate and early-career researchers working on the eighteenth century to meet and discuss their research.

ECRS will take place at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) in Edinburgh on a fortnightly basis from January to April 2017. Each seminar will consist of two papers, one from a University of Edinburgh-based researcher and one from a researcher based in another higher education institution, followed by a drinks reception. Non-University of Edinburgh speakers’ travel expenses will be reimbursed up to £100.

Abstracts of up to 300 words along with a brief biography and institutional affiliation should be submitted in the body of an email to:edinburgh18thcentury@gmail.com

The closing date for submissions is Monday 21 November 2016.
For more information please see our website: http://edinburgh18thcentury.weebly.com/

ECRS is supported by the Eighteenth-Century and Enlightenment Studies Network (ECENS) of the University of Edinburgh.
More information about ECENS can be found at: http://www.blogs.hss.ed.ac.uk/ecens/

Week in Review – 24 July

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My object of the week is this book of spirit drawings by the medium Anna Mary Howitt. Now held at Cambridge University Library Special Collections, the drawings – which date to around 1857 – are the subject of a recent blog post.  Interestingly, the post corresponds with the Courtauld Gallery’s current exhibition Georgiana Houghton: Spirit Drawings, which features watercolours produced by the titular artist. As critics have noted, the show is an important subversion of traditional hierarchical histories of art.

Other objects, posts, articles and links that caught my eye this week included:

Ellie Mackin’s vlog on the Academic Bullet Journal. Like Ellie, I’m deeply interested in both the methodologies and materialities of research, and we’ve shared many discussions about notebooks and how we use them. This video provides a great introduction to using the bullet journal system to organise research projects.

Anna Katharina Schaffner’s post on the history of exhaustion: ‘Why exhaustion is not unique to our overstimulated age‘. My monograph project (tentatively titled Home Ties: Materiality, Identity, and Emotion in British Domestic Space, 1750-1840) is deeply rooted in the histories of emotions and feelings, so I was excited to see this critically-engaged discussion of exhaustion. Schaffner’s book Exhaustion: A History, is also out now via Colombia University Press.

The Nineteenth-Century Matters: Chawton House Library 2016-17 Fellowship, which will provide the successful applicant with affiliation in the form of a Visiting Fellowship at Chawton House Library and the University of Southampton.

Pat Thomson’s review of Les Back’s Academic Diary: Or Why Higher Education Still Matters – a fascinating book that adapts Back’s blog documenting the intricacies of the modern academy.

Lily Ford’s beautifully illustrated article for the Public Domain Review“For the Sake of the Prospect”: Experiencing the World from Above in the Late 18th Century.

Heather Bozant Witcher’s lecture, “Written-Visual Aesthetics: The Rossettis and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood” at the The University of Delaware Library. Witcher’s lecture explores the dynamic creative relationship between Dante Gabriel Rossetti and his sister, Christina.

The CFP for the conferenceFailing at Feelings. Historical Perspectives (1800-2000).

The BARS/Wordsworth Trust Early Career Fellowship, which is designed to help an early career researcher not currently in permanent employment to spend a month living, researching and collaborating in Grasmere.

Kelly Christian’s fascinating articleUnruly: Hair, Politics and Memorial’.

The CFP for the special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review on “Victorian Education and the Periodical Press”.

Week in Review – 21 May

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My pick of the week is the  Paul Mellon Centre’s new online resource, A Catalogue Raisonné of Francis Towne (1739-1816), by Richard Stephens. The site includes a full catalogue of Towne’s known works, accompanied by discursive essays on his outputs. The Catalogue is particularly important for highlighting (and providing access to) a significant body of work by a lesser-known artist, and I’ve no doubt that it will become a crucial resource for scholars of eighteenth-century art and culture.

Other CFPs, conferences, fellowships and courses that caught my eye this week included:

Fondazione 1563 per l’Arte e la Cultura della Compagnia di San Paolo is offering 5 Fellowships for scholars working on “Ornamentation and decoration.The grammar of the orders, the rhetoric of opulence, the appeal to the eye at European Courts (1680-1750)“.

The CFP for the forthcoming Carl Fabergé Conference.

Details for the Paul Mellon Centre’s public lecture course: ‘The English Country House: Art, Politics and Taste‘ (13 October – 1 December 2016).

The Writing Buildings Conference.

The CFP for the Queer Media in the 21st Century Conference.

The new website for The Centre for Travel Writing Studies at Nottingham Trent University, including details of a fully-funded PhD opportunity with the Centre.

The CFP for the Photo-Objects. On the Materiality of Photographs and Photo-Archives in the Humanities and Sciences.  

The CFP for Routledge’s History of the Working Class.

The programme for the Thinking Colour Conference.

The CFP for the A Year’s Art The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1769-2016 conference.

The Style as (Intellectual) Property Conference.

The Body^Space^Object^Memory^Identity Symposium.

The Fraud, fake and make-believe: Transregional and transdisciplinary perspectives workshop.

The programme for The Art Market, Collectors and Agents Conference.

The CFC for the ‘Intersections & Disconnections‘, special issue of the Melbourne Historical Journal, 44.1 (2016).

The CFP for the A Sense of Proportion: Architect-Designed Objects, 1650–1950 Conference.