Conferences

An ISCH bibliographies post

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Usually following a conference, I write some kind of post-conference report, where I reflect on the conversations and ideas that the conference provoked and discussed. For the recent ISCH conference on ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’, I want to do something a little different. Instead of the report format, I want to compile a bibliography of texts that I made note of speakers referencing. As I’m currently writing my monograph on the relationship between domestic material culture, sociabilities, and emotions between 1750-1850, this list has already been a hugely useful bibliography for my own research, but I had a sense as I was compiling it, that it might also be of use to a broader audience interested in state of the history of the emotions today.

This by no means represents a complete bibliography, as the conference had many parallel sessions, and I was only able to attend two days, but it will hopefully give a sense of some of the scholarship that presenters were using to construct their paper’s critical frameworks, and thereby a sense of how the history of the emotions is ‘being done’ at this present moment.

 

Day 1

Panel ‘Emotions in Research’

  • Emily Robinson, ‘Touching the void: Affective history and the impossible’, The Journal of Theory and Practice, 14:4 (2010), 503-520.
  • Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman (Rutgers University Press, 1987)
  • Joan W. Scott, ‘The Evidence of Experience’, Critical Inquiry, 17:4 (Summer, 1991), 773-797.
  • Andy Wood, The memory of the people: custom and popular senses of the past in early modern England (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013)

 

Keynote 1

Erin Sullivan, ‘Art and the Emotional Historian’

Firstly, some relevant publications by Sullivan:

  • Beyond Melancholy: Sadness and Selfhood in Renaissance England (Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • (edited, with Richard Meek) The Renaissance of Emotion: Understanding Affect in Early Modern Literature and Culture (Manchester University Press, 2015)
  • (with Susan Brock and Greg Wells) ‘The Melancholy Earl: Sir William Herbert in the Medical Cases Notes of Dr Barker of Shrewsbury’, Notes and Queries 63:4 (2016)
  • ‘Melancholy’, in Early Modern Emotions: An Introduction, ed. Susan Broomhall (Routledge, 2017)
  • ‘Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay’, in Cahiers Élisabéthains 87 (2015)
  • ‘The History of the Emotions: Past, Present, Future’, Cultural History 2:1 (2013)
  • ‘”The Watchful Spirit”: Religious Anxieties toward Sleep in the Notebooks of Nehemiah Wallington’, Cultural History 1:1 (2012) – winner of the 2011 International Society for Cultural History Essay Prize
  • ‘A Disease unto Death: Sadness in the Time of Shakespeare’, in Emotions and Health, 1200-1700, ed. by Elena Carrera, Brill (Brill, 2013)

 

  • Peter Burke, ‘Is there a Cultural History of the Emotions?’ in Penelope Gouk and Helen Hills (eds.), Representing Emotions (Aldershot, 2005)
  • William M. Reddy, The Making of Romantic Love: Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia, and Japan, 900-1200 CE. (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2012)
  • Thomas Dixon, Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in Tears (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Johan Huizinga, The Waning of the Middle Ages (1919)
  • Reddy, William M. “Against Constructionism: The Historical Ethnography of Emotions.” Current Anthropology 38 (1997), 327-351.
  • Rosenwein, Barbara H. “Worrying about Emotions in History.” The American Historical Review (2002).
  • Peter N. Stearns and Carol Z. Stearns, ‘Emotionology: Clarifying the History of Emotions and Emotional Standards’, The American Historical Review, 90:4 (October, 1985), 813-836.
  • Keith Oatley, Emotions: A Brief History (Wiley, 2004)
  • Stephanie Trigg, Shame and Honor: A Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)
  • http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/25/martha-nussbaums-moral-philosophies
  • Melissa Greg, The Affect Theory Reader (Duke University Press, 2010)
  • Susan J. MattPeter N. Stearns, Doing Emotions History (University of Illinois Press, 2013)

 

Panel ‘Materialising Love and Loss: Objects and Identity in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain’

  • Marcia Pointon, ‘”Surrounded with Brilliants”: Miniature Portraits in Eighteenth-Century England, The Art Bulletin, 83:1 (March, 2001), 48-71
  • Annette Weiner, Inalienable Possessions: The Paradox of Keeping-While-Giving (1992)
  • Anna Moran, Sorcha O’Brien, Love Objects: Emotion, Design and Material Culture (Bloomsbury, 2014)
  • Diana O’hara, ‘The Language of Tokens and the Making of Marriage’, Rural History, 3:1 (1992), 1-40
  • Diana O’hara, Courtship and constraint: Rethinking the making of marriage in Tudor England (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002)
  • Neil McKendrickJohn BrewerJohn Harold Plumb, The birth of a consumer societythe commercialization of eighteenth-century England (Europa Publications, 1982) 
  • John Brewer and Roy Porter, eds. Consumption and the World of Goods (Routledge, 1993)
  • Anne Gerritsen, Giorgio Riello, eds. The Global Lives of ThingsThe Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World (Routledge, 2015) 
  • Cynthia Wall, The Prose of Things: Transformations of Description in the Eighteenth Century (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2006)
  • Frank Trentmann, Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First, (London: Allen Lane/Penguin; New York: HarperCollins 2016)
  • Michael Brown, ‘Cold Steel, Weak Flesh’: Mechanism, Masculinity and the Anxieties of Late Victorian Empire’, CULTURAL & SOCIAL HISTORY, 14: 2 (2017) 
  • Michael Brown, ‘Surgery and Emotion: The Era Before Anaesthesia’, The Palgrave Handbook of the History of Surgery. T. Schlich ed. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
  • Matthew McCormack, Embodying the Militia in Georgian England (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Sarah Ahmed, The Cultural Politics of Emotion (Routledge, 2007)
  • Philip Shaw, Suffering and Sentiment in Romantic Military Art (Ashgate, 2013)
  • Holly Furneaux, and Prichard, S. ‘Contested objects: curating soldier art. Museum & Society 13:4 (2015), 447-461.
  • Holly Furneaux, Military men of feeling: masculinity, emotion and tactility in the Crimean War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015)

 

Day 2

Keynote 2

Barbara H. Rosenwein, ‘Affect Theory’s Convergences and Conundrums’

Relevant publications by Rosenwein:

  • Anger’s Past: The Social Uses of an Emotion in the Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 1998)
  • Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 2006)
  • Generations of Feeling: A History of Emotions 600-1700  (Cambridge University Press, 2016)
  • “Problems and Methods in the History of Emotions,” Passions in Context: Journal of the History and Philosophy of the Emotions, 1:1 (2010)

 

  • Lisa Feldman Barrett, How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain (Pan Macmillan2017)
  • Magda Arnold, Emotion and personality (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960)
  • Bruce R. Smith, The Key of Green: PASSION AND PERCEPTION IN RENAISSANCE CULTURE (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008)
  • Brian Massumi, Politics of Affect (John Wiley & Sons2015)
  • Nicole Eustace, Passion Is the GaleEmotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (UNC Press Books, 2012)
  • Nicole Eustace, 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)

 

Panel: The affective turn in the history of the East-West encounter

  • Elsbeth Locher-Scholten, Women and the Colonial StateEssays on Gender and Modernity in the Netherlands Indies, 1900-1942 (Amsterdam University Press, 2000)
  • Kartini (Raden Adjeng), KartiniThe Complete Writings 1898-1904 (Monash University Publishing, 2014) 

 

Panel: Motherhood, medicine and the emotions

  • Laura Gowing, Common bodies : women, touch and power in seventeenth-century England (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2002)
  • Laura Gowing, Gender Relations in Early Modern England (Pearson Longman, 2012)
  • Adrian Wilson, ‘THE PERILS OF EARLY MODERN PROCREATION: CHILDBIRTH WITH OR WITHOUT FEAR?’ Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 16 (1993), 1–19

Conference: Slavery and the Scottish Country House

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On Friday I’m heading to the Slavery and the Scottish Country House event, a day workshop examining the connections between Scotland and slavery through the medium of the Scottish country house, hosted by the Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies at the University of Edinburgh. The programme is available here, and I’ll be sure to post a follow up blog on some of the conversations that arose from the conference.

Programme: ISCH 2017 Conference ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’

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For the next few days I’ll be in Umeå, Sweden for the 2017 Annual Conference of the International Society for Cultural History. This year’s theme is ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’, and it promises to be a fascinating conference. I’m really excited to experience a range of approaches dealing with the emotions within cultural history, which I’ve no doubt will be hugely beneficial to the writing of my first book, on domestic material culture, sociabilities, and emotions. Tomorrow I’ll be speaking in Panel 8, ‘Materialising Love and Loss: Objects and Identity in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain’. The full programme is available here.

Week in Review – 19 March

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33005859916_69ac826dc4_b.jpgRobert Dighton, The Macaroni Painter, or Billy Dimple sitting for his Picture, 1772. British Museum, London.

First up, Dominic Janes’ post, ‘A Queer Taste for Macaroni‘, on the Public Domain Review. I recently had an article accepted for a special issue of Aphra Behn Online: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830 that explores the concept of “camp” with regards to eighteenth-century studies. My article will locate macaronism within a visual and ironic rhetoric of campness, and Janes’ new book Oscar Wilde Prefigured: Queer Fashioning and British Caricature, 1750-1900 is an essential resource for this work. 

Secondly, I was hugely excited to read about the National Gallery of Victoria’s upcoming exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800, which draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe.

I also enjoyed reading this review of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge’s exhibition Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy, which the role of domestic objects in sustaining and inspiring faith.

I was also intrigued to read: this post from Notches Blog on ‘Porno Chic and the Sex Wars: A Roundtable on the Politics of Sexual Representations in the 1970s‘; and this fascinating article on the spiritualist artist Hima af Klint.

I’ve got several multi-media picks this week: first, this episode of The Why Factor on using our hands; this episode of the Art Detective Podcast on Tipu’s Tiger – with Sona Datta; and finally, this video of Mary Beard’s lecture, Women in Power.

The following CFPs and conferences also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Fashion, Dress, and Post-Postmodernism (September 20, 2017)

CFP: Vistas. 19th Century Studies (Philadelphia, 15-17 Mar 18)

CONF: Rejection & Recovery in the History of Art & Architecture (Boston, 24-25 Mar 17)

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

CFP: Art of Power: The 3rd Earl of Bute, Politics and Collecting in Enlightenment Britain (2nd Oct 2017 – 4th Oct 2017)

WORKSHOP: Approaching Inner Lives: Thinking, Feeling, Believing, 1300-1900 (Tuesday 28 March 2017)

Week in Review – 19 February

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John Richard Coke Smyth, Elizabeth, Lady Eastlake. Watercolour
4 3/4 in. x 4 1/4 in. (121 mm x 108 mm), National Portrait Gallery, London.

First up, the conference programme for the Writing Art: Women Writers as Art Critics in the Long Eighteenth Century conference. The conference intersects with a number of my projects, firstly an article I’m currently writing on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women travel writers and the narratives they tell through objects, and secondly, #WaysofSheing, a twitter-based project that aims to highlight and celebrate the contributions of female art historians. The conference features presentations on Elizabeth, Lady Eastlake (pictured above), Germaine de Staël, and the travel writer Maria Graham.

I enjoyed Sarah Read’s article ‘‘Gushing Out Blood’: Defloration and Menstruation in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure‘, from a recent edition of the Journal of Medical Humanities.  In the article Read explores how Cleland ‘repeatedly depicts and eroticises the act of defloration’ in his erotic 1740s novel Fanny Hill. 

Deborah Cohen’s The Atlantic article ‘Before Straight and Gay: The discreet, disorienting passions of the Victorian era‘, which begins with a microcosmic examination of the queer histories of the Benson family, is a fascinating read.

I was fascinated by this BBC News video, on the forgotten Victorian botanical painter Marianne North.

I also really enjoyed this revealing interview with April Haynes, author of Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-Century America in a recent post on the Notches blog.

As ever, the Public Domain Review has been a wonderful source of articles and objects. I particularly enjoyed this recent essay by Yvonne Seale on nineteenth-century genealogy.

The following CFPs and conferences also caught my attention:

CONF: Women, Authorship, and Identity in the Long Eighteenth Century: New Methodologies (June 17, 2017)

CFP: Anonymity Unmasked: Identity, Agency, Responsibility (September 13-15, 2017)

CFP: Death and the Maiden (July 21-24, 2017)

CFP: Romanticism and Popular Culture (November 3-5, 2017)

War Through Other Stuff Conference

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I’m excited to be chairing a panel on ‘The Power of Objects’ at the upcoming War Through Other Stuff conference, which brings together interdisciplinary perspectives on war as told through non-military narratives, artistic interpretations, and the material culture of conflict. The programme and further information about the conference is available here.

Week in Review – 15 January

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First up, I’m hugely excited by the programme for this year’s Slade Lectures, which will be given by Caroline van Eck. Eck’s work on objects, experience, senses, rituals and neoclassicism are critical in my own work, but the Lectures are an unmissable series for anyone interested in the history of art. Fingers crossed the lectures will be podcasted, as they have been in previous years.

I read with interest Nathan Perl-Rosenthal’s series on ‘Plotting Revolution‘, for the Age of Revolutions blog. This three-part series considers the complex relationship between history and narrative, something which is also explored in the fascinating Storying the Past project, which will discuss the book The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing (and therefore, issues surrounding women’s life-writing and biography) via twitter in February.

I also enjoyed Anne-Lieke Brem’s post Things that matter(-ed): A biography of anatomical votive reliefs for The Votives Project, which reflects on issues of biography and the changing value of ancient votive reliefs as ‘things’.

I was also made aware of the Association for Critical Race Art History‘s fantastic bibliographic resource this week. Their site provides a number of bibliographies, divided by region, for those seeking to investigate issues of race and ethnicity in art and visual culture. These extensive bibliographies are available here.

As ever, the latest issue of the Journal of Art Historiography provides a fascinating selection of articles, translations and discussions. In the December 2016 issue, I was particularly intrigued by the discussions of ‘Baroque for a wide public’, which seek to add nuance to dominant histories of this global movement.

The following CFPs, CFAs and conferences also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Carnal Canucks, Histories of Sexuality in Canada

CFP: ANTIPODEAN ANTIQUITIES: CLASSICAL RECEPTION ‘DOWN UNDER’

CFP – Nostalgia & Consumer Culture in the 20th Century; SSHA 2017

CFC: The Spaces and Places of Horror

CONF: Coding and Representation

CONF: Trauma & Melodrama: Emotions in the Public Sphere / Conference in Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago

CFP: From Abolition to Black Lives Matter: Past and Present Forms of Transnational Black Resistance

CFP: Photography and the Histories of Working Peoples and Laboring Lives

Finally, I’m excited to see the Glad to be Gay exhibition, which draws on the unique Hall-Carpenter Archives and the Women’s Library collection to mark the 50th anniversary of a pivotal piece of legislation, the 1967 Sexual Offences Act. Glad to be Gay will be at LSE, London, until April.