CFP

Week in Review – 23 July

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My object of the week is this INCREDIBLE Album of Seaweed Pictures from 1848, now held at the Brooklyn Museum. The album was made as a gift for Augustus Graham, a member of the first board of directors of the Brooklyn Apprentice’s Library, later to become the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences and the Brooklyn Museum.

I was really sorry to miss the Beyond Between Men symposium, so I hugely enjoyed reading Rachel E. Moss’s round-up blog post about the event. You can read it here.

The BAVS Talks 2017 videos are now all up online. You can take a look here.

CFP: CAA 2018 – Imperial Islands: Vision and Experience in the American Empire after 1898

Although the CFP deadline for the Home Comforts: The physical and emotional meanings of home in Europe, 1650-1900 conference has now passed, I still wanted to bring attention to this fascinating-sounding conference, which intersects interestingly with my current book project.

The edited volume Feminism and Art History Now: Radical Critiques of Theory and Practice, is out now from I B Tauris, and will be an essential resource for anyone using feminist theory in their art historical writing.

NOTCHES is seeking contributions for an upcoming and continuing series on transgender histories. See the CFP for full details, deadline September 15, 2017.

Issue 6 (Summer 2017) of British Art Studies is now live. The special issue focuses on Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600–1500, and examines lots of fascinating objects at length and in depth.

Other conferences, CFPs, etc that caught my eye this week included:

  • CONF: Re/presenting the Body (Glasgow, 6-7 Jul 17)
  • CFP: Jewellery Matters (Amsterdam, 16-17 Nov 17)
  • CONF: Film|Bild|Emotion (Regensburg, 20-21 Jul 18)
  • CFP: Collecting Medieval Sculpture (Paris, 23-24 Nov 17)
  • CONF: Nineteenth-Century Art in Islamic Countries (Vienna, 6-9
    Jul 17)
  • CFP: Temporary and Mobile Domesticities, 1600 to the present – 10.10.2017, London
  • CFC: Special Issue of The History of the Family
  • CFP: Issue: Material and Visual Cultures of Religion in the American South

Week in Review – 19 March

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33005859916_69ac826dc4_b.jpgRobert Dighton, The Macaroni Painter, or Billy Dimple sitting for his Picture, 1772. British Museum, London.

First up, Dominic Janes’ post, ‘A Queer Taste for Macaroni‘, on the Public Domain Review. I recently had an article accepted for a special issue of Aphra Behn Online: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830 that explores the concept of “camp” with regards to eighteenth-century studies. My article will locate macaronism within a visual and ironic rhetoric of campness, and Janes’ new book Oscar Wilde Prefigured: Queer Fashioning and British Caricature, 1750-1900 is an essential resource for this work. 

Secondly, I was hugely excited to read about the National Gallery of Victoria’s upcoming exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800, which draws upon the NGV’s diverse permanent collection to explore the theme of love in art, and the changing representations of this complex emotion throughout the early modern period in Europe.

I also enjoyed reading this review of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge’s exhibition Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy, which the role of domestic objects in sustaining and inspiring faith.

I was also intrigued to read: this post from Notches Blog on ‘Porno Chic and the Sex Wars: A Roundtable on the Politics of Sexual Representations in the 1970s‘; and this fascinating article on the spiritualist artist Hima af Klint.

I’ve got several multi-media picks this week: first, this episode of The Why Factor on using our hands; this episode of the Art Detective Podcast on Tipu’s Tiger – with Sona Datta; and finally, this video of Mary Beard’s lecture, Women in Power.

The following CFPs and conferences also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Fashion, Dress, and Post-Postmodernism (September 20, 2017)

CFP: Vistas. 19th Century Studies (Philadelphia, 15-17 Mar 18)

CONF: Rejection & Recovery in the History of Art & Architecture (Boston, 24-25 Mar 17)

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

CFP: Art of Power: The 3rd Earl of Bute, Politics and Collecting in Enlightenment Britain (2nd Oct 2017 – 4th Oct 2017)

WORKSHOP: Approaching Inner Lives: Thinking, Feeling, Believing, 1300-1900 (Tuesday 28 March 2017)

Week in Review – 15 January

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First up, I’m hugely excited by the programme for this year’s Slade Lectures, which will be given by Caroline van Eck. Eck’s work on objects, experience, senses, rituals and neoclassicism are critical in my own work, but the Lectures are an unmissable series for anyone interested in the history of art. Fingers crossed the lectures will be podcasted, as they have been in previous years.

I read with interest Nathan Perl-Rosenthal’s series on ‘Plotting Revolution‘, for the Age of Revolutions blog. This three-part series considers the complex relationship between history and narrative, something which is also explored in the fascinating Storying the Past project, which will discuss the book The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing (and therefore, issues surrounding women’s life-writing and biography) via twitter in February.

I also enjoyed Anne-Lieke Brem’s post Things that matter(-ed): A biography of anatomical votive reliefs for The Votives Project, which reflects on issues of biography and the changing value of ancient votive reliefs as ‘things’.

I was also made aware of the Association for Critical Race Art History‘s fantastic bibliographic resource this week. Their site provides a number of bibliographies, divided by region, for those seeking to investigate issues of race and ethnicity in art and visual culture. These extensive bibliographies are available here.

As ever, the latest issue of the Journal of Art Historiography provides a fascinating selection of articles, translations and discussions. In the December 2016 issue, I was particularly intrigued by the discussions of ‘Baroque for a wide public’, which seek to add nuance to dominant histories of this global movement.

The following CFPs, CFAs and conferences also caught my attention this week:

CFP: Carnal Canucks, Histories of Sexuality in Canada

CFP: ANTIPODEAN ANTIQUITIES: CLASSICAL RECEPTION ‘DOWN UNDER’

CFP – Nostalgia & Consumer Culture in the 20th Century; SSHA 2017

CFC: The Spaces and Places of Horror

CONF: Coding and Representation

CONF: Trauma & Melodrama: Emotions in the Public Sphere / Conference in Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago

CFP: From Abolition to Black Lives Matter: Past and Present Forms of Transnational Black Resistance

CFP: Photography and the Histories of Working Peoples and Laboring Lives

Finally, I’m excited to see the Glad to be Gay exhibition, which draws on the unique Hall-Carpenter Archives and the Women’s Library collection to mark the 50th anniversary of a pivotal piece of legislation, the 1967 Sexual Offences Act. Glad to be Gay will be at LSE, London, until April.

Week in Review – 8 January

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Screen Shot 2017-01-08 at 20.51.01.jpgImage via The Conversation 

Perhaps the most significant event this week, was the passing of the great art critic John Berger, whose hugely influential book and tv series ‘Ways of Seeing’, has been a touchstone of art historical and critical enquiry since its publication in the 1970s. Many excellent articles and obituaries of Berger were published this week, including this, this, and this.

I was excited to see that Joanne Begiato’s article ‘Tears and the Manly Sailor in England, c. 1760–1860‘, in the Journal for Maritime Research is free access. Download it here.

I greatly enjoyed the post, ‘Feel free to call me Dr.’ on the Tenure, She Wrote blog. It’s excellent on the politics of nomenclature in academia, and the importance of these issues for academics who are from minority backgrounds. I also enjoyed Dr Kieran Fenby-Hulse’s post, ‘From 2016 to 2017: Thoughts on Research Practice, Embedding Creativity, Punk Academia, and Work-Life Balance‘, which is also great on issues of identity within the academy.

There were a number of events that drew my attention this week, including the Centre for the History of the Emotions‘ 2017 Seminar Programme , the upcoming event ‘Living With Feeling in the Nineteenth-Century‘ at Royal Holloway’s Centre for Victorian Studies, and the Cruising the 1970s project’s eventBetween the Sheets: Radical print cultures before the queer bookshop‘.

The following CFPs also caught my eye:

Call for Submissions: Anthology on Arab Masculinity

CFP: Moving Beyond Paris and London: Influences, Circulation, and Rivalries in Fashion and Textiles between France and England, 1700-1914 (Paris, October 13-14, 2017)

CFP: Remembering the Dead: Slavery and Mortality through Visual Culture in Comparative Perspective, AHA 2018 Panel (Washington D.C., 4-7 January 2018)

Call for Submissions: Museums Journal (theme: ‘Small’)

Call for Participation: Material Culture Caucus at 2017 ASA Conference

Business, Wealth, Enterprise, and Debt: The Economic Side of Mormon History, 1830-1930

CFP: “Hope and Fear”: Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities

CFP: Milestones, Markers, and Moments: Turning Points in American Experience and Tradition

CFPInternational Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Conference (20-21 April 2017, University of Bristol)

CFP: Classical Antiquity & Memory (19th – 21st Century)

CFP: BAVS 2017 conference, Victorians Unbound

I also really enjoyed the following interview with the design historian Glenn Adamson, titled, ‘The Object as Reality-Check’. It’s a fascinating read that ties discussions of material objects, past and present, with their political contexts. Specifically, Adamson discusses this in relation to his recent course ‘Objects of Dispute‘, a 10 session-long intensive seminar offered as part of the MA in History of Design and Curatorial Studies, run jointly by The New School’s Parsons School of Design and the Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York, and in so doing, teases out the pedagogical issues of teaching about contentious material culture in the current political climate.

Tonight, I listened to my colleague Christian Weikop’s fascinating Radio 3 programme, Kandinsky – A Story of Revolution. It’s available on iPlayer now.

Finally, I note that Yale Center for British Art is advertising its Curatorial Research Fellowship opportunity – there’s just a few more days left, so submit your applications while you can!

Week in Review – 1 January

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Happy New Year to all my readers. 2017 promises to be an exciting year, but I’ll talk more about that in Wednesday’s post. For now, here’s a roundup of everything that caught my attention in the final week of 2016.

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First up, these Summer 2017 internships with the Boston Furniture Archive, which sound like a fantastic opportunity to do some hands-on collection based work.

Next, the Centre for the History of the Emotions’ 2016 Annual Lecture by Professor Stephen Brooke (University of York, CA). Titled ‘Hate and Fear: Emotion, Politics and Race in 1980s London’, the lecture is now on the centre’s youtube channel.

The Bard Graduate Center’ forthcoming Summer Institute American Material Culture: Nineteenth-Century New York (July 3–28, 2017), also caught my eye. Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute promises a in-depth look at the history of New York and its associated material culture.

Prompted by Karen Kelsky’s excellent recent Vitae blog ‘The Job Market in a New Administration’, I also read Ellen Willis’s essayIdentity Crisis‘ for the first time this month. As issues of identity are at the forefront of this changing political landscape, prolonged considerations of the meaning and manifestations of identity have never been more important. Willis’s essay, though written in 1992, is incredibly relevant for the current academic and political climate.

The following conferences, CFAs and CFPs also sound particularly interesting (with many touching on issues of identity that are so relevant to Willis’s essay):

  • CFP/Manuscripts: Special Issue of Journal of Homosexuality, “LGBTQ Popular Culture: The Changing Landscape”
  • CFP: #QueerAF: (Re)presenting Gender & Sexuality in History & Cultural Studies
  • CFP: 2017 Midwest Art History Society Session: “Is there an African Atlantic?
  • CONF: Politics in fashion and textiles (Vienna, 19-21 Jan 17)
  • CFP: Conflict, Healing and the Arts (Durham, 27 May 17)
  • CFP: The Coarseness of the Brontës: A Reappraisal (Durham, 10-11 Aug 17)
  • CFP: Material and Sensory Cultures of Religion
  • CFP: Material Culture Research Symposium (Glasgow, 12 June 17)
  • CFP: American Identities on Land and at Sea (New York, 21 Apr 17)

My final pick is the CFP for the multidisciplinary collection Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures, which examines ‘the creation and circulation of colonial visual cultures from the Caribbean during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries’. The CFP reminded me of another recent publication, The Colour of Shadows: Images of Caribbean Slavery by Judy Raymond. I’m excited to read each of them.

Week in Review – 11 December

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It’s been a few weeks since my last Week in Review, so this week is a bit of a bumper post of exhibitions, conferences, talks, articles, and CFPs – enjoy!

7.-lycidas.jpgCharlotte Brontë, Lycidas, Watercolour drawing, March 4, 1835. Copied from a print after painting by Henry Fuseli. Brontë Parsonage Museum.

Exhibitions 

First up, I want to highlight The Morgan Library & Museum’s exhibition Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will, which includes many examples of her juvenalia, as explored in this beautifully-written and illustrated article in The Paris Review.

Secondly, the Bard Graduate Center’s exhibition Charles Percier: Architecture and Design in an Age of Revolutions, which runs until February 5, 2017 and is the first large-scale exhibition to survey the French architect and interior designer. The Center recently hosted an accompanying symposium on Percier: Antiquity and Empire, which can be viewed on the centre’s youtube channel (which also features this rather good recent talk on Eames, by the hugely important design historian Pat Kirkham).

Thirdly, the forthcoming exhibition of Maria Sibylla Merian’s work, Maria Merian’s Butterflies, which will be at The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse from 17 March 2017. There will be an accompanying conference (Changing the Nature of Art and Science: Intersections with Maria Sibylla Merian) from 7-9 June 2017, in Amsterdam.

Conferences and CFPs

  • the CFP for the Handling, Placing and Looking at Photographs conference, Florence, 12-13 Oct 17
  • the CFP for Spaces of Remembering and Forgetting: An Interdisciplinary Conference 
  • the CFP for the The Art of Remembrance: Family, Art and Memory in New England
  • the Kitchens and Kitchen Gardens conference, 18 Jan 2017, London
  • the Women as art critics in 18thC conference 25 Feb 2017, Chawton House Library
  • the CFP for the Graduate Student Symposium – History of 19th-Century Art, New York, 26 Mar 17
  • the CFC for Age and Gender: Ageing in the Nineteenth Century, a Nineteenth Century Gender Studies special issue
Books and Journals 

I’m super excited for Heidi Thomson’s new book, Coleridge and the Romantic Newspaper: The Morning Post and the Road to Dejection, which will undoubtedly be an important resource for work on Romantic reading practices.

The past month has also featured a new issues from a number of innovative online journals and publishing outlets, including:

Blog Posts & Websites 

I don’t think I’ve spoken before about my love of the Age of Revolutions blog. This increased exponentially this month thanks to their multi-part series on alcohol in its revolutionary contexts and which featured posts on the ‘TRANS-IMPERIAL GEOGRAPHIES OF RUM: PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION‘, ‘THE FALSE HOPE OF CORN STALK RUM DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION‘, ‘INTOXICATION AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION‘, and ‘RUM, OATHS, AND SLAVE UPRISINGS IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION‘. The series has been a fascinating look at how the quotidian and the political intersect.

I’ve also been enjoying the Romantic Illustration Network‘s Image of the Month series. This time, it was Theodore von Holst’s ‘Frankenstein’ (1831), which is discussed at length in Ian Haywood’s fascinating post on the image.

Finally, I’ve found source lists such as Mark Carrigan’s post The Sociology of Trump: An Initial Reading List, or The New Inquiry’s post A Time for Treason, to be invaluable resources in the wake of November’s Presidential election.

Week in Review – 23 October

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melisabeth.jpgMadame Elisabeth de France – 1782
Oil on Canvas, 71 x 54 cm, Versailles

I was greatly saddened last week to hear of the passing of Mary D. Sheriff, the internationally celebrated art historian. Her obit on Enfilade was both touching, and a compelling reminder of her contribution to the history eighteenth-century art and gender. My favourite work of hers is perhaps her 1996 book, The exceptional woman: Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun and the cultural politics of art, a text that I plan on re-reading imminently.

As part of my curation of the We the Humanities twitter feed this week, I shared a number of my favourite material culture podcasts. I thought I might also share them here: they include The Hunterian’s Object Lessons podcast, and the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Research Collections podcast, The Collection. I’m also a big fan of the Histories of the Unexpected podcast, which often takes material objects as its point of departure.

I was very excited to see that next year’s LGBT History Month theme is ‘heritage’. I’m intrigued to see how this theme will be interpreted by historians, curators and material culture specialists as part of the month’s events.

I recently enjoyed Helen Rogers’ blogpostStyle, Story, History‘, which discussed the craft of historical writing, and the role of metaphor and narrative within it. I particularly enjoyed her discussion of writing as a collage, which is an issue I’ve been reflecting on as I continue work on my assemblage/collage project. Similarly, Jonathan Willis’s recent postFor yee lead your liues in great ignorance’: Puritan Ponderings on the Patchwork of Popular Belief‘, for the collaborative blog, The Many Headed Monster, also used patchwork as a framework for his research. Going forward, I hope to employ some of these ideas in my own writing on collage.

Other CFPs, conferences and journals that caught my eye this week included:

The Decor and Architecture in the 17th & 18th Centuries conference.

The Working on Things. On the Social, Political, and Economic History of
Collected Objects conference.

The latest issue of The BARS Review.

The programme for the Maritime Masculinities conference.