Week in Review – 12 May

Here’s my round up of articles, books, events, and anything else that caught my eye last week…

First up: the Met Gala. I mean, I’m always interested in the Met Gala (fashioned themed around an exhibition, hello!), but this year, fashion and the subject of some of my recent research – camp – intersected in the most timely manner. In line with Sontag’s definition of the term, there were some eighteenth-century themed looks (see Urie, below) and the exhibition featured a Rigaud displayed against bubblegum walls. High camp indeed.

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There were a couple of pieces I particularly enjoyed both prior to and following the event: Danielle Thom’s blog post ‘camp: notes on craft’; this hypebeast behind the scenes piece; this Vogue bit on the exhibition; and finally, this by Chloe Esslemont (of Tabloid Art History fame), on why panniers would be the perfect choice for the Gala. The publication of Ula Klein’s & Emily Kugler’s special issue of Aphra Behn Online on C18 camp (in which I have a piece on macaroni prints!) was even timed with the Gala. You can read the whole issue here.

I’m now seriously considering a trip to New York when I go to Philadelphia in August – more on that soon!

Beyond the Met Gala, a couple of other things that got my attention – firstly, these reflective posts following the recent ‘Eighteenth Century Now‘ conference.

This article on ‘female property ownership as economic strategy in mid-nineteenth-century urban England

Paul Binski’s new book on gothic sculpture, Gothic Sculpture: Eloquence, Craft, and Materials, and Edward Cooke’s new monograph Inventing Boston: Design, Production, and Consumption, 1680–1720

I’m always interested in new innovations and formats in scholarly publishing, so this new series from the IHR definitely piqued my interest – IHR Shorts: a new Open Access series

This podcast from the symposium, ‘Trans Studies, Trans Lives: Past, Present, and Future’

This digital facsimile of the incredibly zany The Philosophy of Beards (1854)

This conference on Gender, Labour, and Consumption in Historical Perspective at the University of Essex.

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