An ISCH bibliographies post

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Usually following a conference, I write some kind of post-conference report, where I reflect on the conversations and ideas that the conference provoked and discussed. For the recent ISCH conference on ‘Senses, Emotions & the Affective Turn Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History’, I want to do something a little different. Instead of the report format, I want to compile a bibliography of texts that I made note of speakers referencing. As I’m currently writing my monograph on the relationship between domestic material culture, sociabilities, and emotions between 1750-1850, this list has already been a hugely useful bibliography for my own research, but I had a sense as I was compiling it, that it might also be of use to a broader audience interested in state of the history of the emotions today.

This by no means represents a complete bibliography, as the conference had many parallel sessions, and I was only able to attend two days, but it will hopefully give a sense of some of the scholarship that presenters were using to construct their paper’s critical frameworks, and thereby a sense of how the history of the emotions is ‘being done’ at this present moment.

 

Day 1

Panel ‘Emotions in Research’

  • Emily Robinson, ‘Touching the void: Affective history and the impossible’, The Journal of Theory and Practice, 14:4 (2010), 503-520.
  • Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman (Rutgers University Press, 1987)
  • Joan W. Scott, ‘The Evidence of Experience’, Critical Inquiry, 17:4 (Summer, 1991), 773-797.
  • Andy Wood, The memory of the people: custom and popular senses of the past in early modern England (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013)

 

Keynote 1

Erin Sullivan, ‘Art and the Emotional Historian’

Firstly, some relevant publications by Sullivan:

  • Beyond Melancholy: Sadness and Selfhood in Renaissance England (Oxford University Press, 2016)
  • (edited, with Richard Meek) The Renaissance of Emotion: Understanding Affect in Early Modern Literature and Culture (Manchester University Press, 2015)
  • (with Susan Brock and Greg Wells) ‘The Melancholy Earl: Sir William Herbert in the Medical Cases Notes of Dr Barker of Shrewsbury’, Notes and Queries 63:4 (2016)
  • ‘Melancholy’, in Early Modern Emotions: An Introduction, ed. Susan Broomhall (Routledge, 2017)
  • ‘Shakespeare and Emotion: A Review Essay’, in Cahiers Élisabéthains 87 (2015)
  • ‘The History of the Emotions: Past, Present, Future’, Cultural History 2:1 (2013)
  • ‘”The Watchful Spirit”: Religious Anxieties toward Sleep in the Notebooks of Nehemiah Wallington’, Cultural History 1:1 (2012) – winner of the 2011 International Society for Cultural History Essay Prize
  • ‘A Disease unto Death: Sadness in the Time of Shakespeare’, in Emotions and Health, 1200-1700, ed. by Elena Carrera, Brill (Brill, 2013)

 

  • Peter Burke, ‘Is there a Cultural History of the Emotions?’ in Penelope Gouk and Helen Hills (eds.), Representing Emotions (Aldershot, 2005)
  • William M. Reddy, The Making of Romantic Love: Longing and Sexuality in Europe, South Asia, and Japan, 900-1200 CE. (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2012)
  • Thomas Dixon, Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in Tears (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Johan Huizinga, The Waning of the Middle Ages (1919)
  • Reddy, William M. “Against Constructionism: The Historical Ethnography of Emotions.” Current Anthropology 38 (1997), 327-351.
  • Rosenwein, Barbara H. “Worrying about Emotions in History.” The American Historical Review (2002).
  • Peter N. Stearns and Carol Z. Stearns, ‘Emotionology: Clarifying the History of Emotions and Emotional Standards’, The American Historical Review, 90:4 (October, 1985), 813-836.
  • Keith Oatley, Emotions: A Brief History (Wiley, 2004)
  • Stephanie Trigg, Shame and Honor: A Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)
  • http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/25/martha-nussbaums-moral-philosophies
  • Melissa Greg, The Affect Theory Reader (Duke University Press, 2010)
  • Susan J. MattPeter N. Stearns, Doing Emotions History (University of Illinois Press, 2013)

 

Panel ‘Materialising Love and Loss: Objects and Identity in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Britain’

  • Marcia Pointon, ‘”Surrounded with Brilliants”: Miniature Portraits in Eighteenth-Century England, The Art Bulletin, 83:1 (March, 2001), 48-71
  • Annette Weiner, Inalienable Possessions: The Paradox of Keeping-While-Giving (1992)
  • Anna Moran, Sorcha O’Brien, Love Objects: Emotion, Design and Material Culture (Bloomsbury, 2014)
  • Diana O’hara, ‘The Language of Tokens and the Making of Marriage’, Rural History, 3:1 (1992), 1-40
  • Diana O’hara, Courtship and constraint: Rethinking the making of marriage in Tudor England (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002)
  • Neil McKendrickJohn BrewerJohn Harold Plumb, The birth of a consumer societythe commercialization of eighteenth-century England (Europa Publications, 1982) 
  • John Brewer and Roy Porter, eds. Consumption and the World of Goods (Routledge, 1993)
  • Anne Gerritsen, Giorgio Riello, eds. The Global Lives of ThingsThe Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World (Routledge, 2015) 
  • Cynthia Wall, The Prose of Things: Transformations of Description in the Eighteenth Century (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2006)
  • Frank Trentmann, Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First, (London: Allen Lane/Penguin; New York: HarperCollins 2016)
  • Michael Brown, ‘Cold Steel, Weak Flesh’: Mechanism, Masculinity and the Anxieties of Late Victorian Empire’, CULTURAL & SOCIAL HISTORY, 14: 2 (2017) 
  • Michael Brown, ‘Surgery and Emotion: The Era Before Anaesthesia’, The Palgrave Handbook of the History of Surgery. T. Schlich ed. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
  • Matthew McCormack, Embodying the Militia in Georgian England (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • Sarah Ahmed, The Cultural Politics of Emotion (Routledge, 2007)
  • Philip Shaw, Suffering and Sentiment in Romantic Military Art (Ashgate, 2013)
  • Holly Furneaux, and Prichard, S. ‘Contested objects: curating soldier art. Museum & Society 13:4 (2015), 447-461.
  • Holly Furneaux, Military men of feeling: masculinity, emotion and tactility in the Crimean War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015)

 

Day 2

Keynote 2

Barbara H. Rosenwein, ‘Affect Theory’s Convergences and Conundrums’

Relevant publications by Rosenwein:

  • Anger’s Past: The Social Uses of an Emotion in the Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 1998)
  • Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 2006)
  • Generations of Feeling: A History of Emotions 600-1700  (Cambridge University Press, 2016)
  • “Problems and Methods in the History of Emotions,” Passions in Context: Journal of the History and Philosophy of the Emotions, 1:1 (2010)

 

  • Lisa Feldman Barrett, How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain (Pan Macmillan2017)
  • Magda Arnold, Emotion and personality (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960)
  • Bruce R. Smith, The Key of Green: PASSION AND PERCEPTION IN RENAISSANCE CULTURE (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008)
  • Brian Massumi, Politics of Affect (John Wiley & Sons2015)
  • Nicole Eustace, Passion Is the GaleEmotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (UNC Press Books, 2012)
  • Nicole Eustace, 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012)

 

Panel: The affective turn in the history of the East-West encounter

  • Elsbeth Locher-Scholten, Women and the Colonial StateEssays on Gender and Modernity in the Netherlands Indies, 1900-1942 (Amsterdam University Press, 2000)
  • Kartini (Raden Adjeng), KartiniThe Complete Writings 1898-1904 (Monash University Publishing, 2014) 

 

Panel: Motherhood, medicine and the emotions

  • Laura Gowing, Common bodies : women, touch and power in seventeenth-century England (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2002)
  • Laura Gowing, Gender Relations in Early Modern England (Pearson Longman, 2012)
  • Adrian Wilson, ‘THE PERILS OF EARLY MODERN PROCREATION: CHILDBIRTH WITH OR WITHOUT FEAR?’ Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 16 (1993), 1–19
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