Month: February 2016

ECRS – 29 February

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Please join us for the fifth session in the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series. The session will present new work in eighteenth-century studies, with an emphasis on statecraft and monarchy. Jonathan Singerton (University of Edinburgh), will present his paper ‘Thomas Jefferson and the Habsburg Monarchy: A Tale of Intrigue and Statecraft, 1783-1787’, and Aurore Chéry (University of Lyon 3) will present her paper,‘Redefining the Image of the King of France after the Seven Years War’.

All are welcome. Seminars are held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

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Week in Review – 28 February

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Image from the MGHG Biennial Conference site.

The upcoming MGHG Biennial Conference: Gendering Museum Histories (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 7-8 September 2016). You can find the CFP here.

The AAH Summer Symposium 2016Gender in art: production, collection, display.

The Online Introduction to Oral History Workshop

The Migrating Objects: Material Culture and Italian Identities conference.

The Smithsonian-Mason Summer Field SchoolTreasure Houses of Scotland: Royal Heritage. 

The World, Empires and Nations: The Redefinition of “Colonial Art” conference.

The latest volume of the Journal of Curatorial Studies on Museums and Affect.

The programme for Constructing the Architectural Canon (Wassenaar, 22-23 Feb 16).

The CFP for the What do Contentious Objects Want? conference.

The following posts for Notches blog: Olivia Weisser on “She was both Poxt and Clapt together”: Confessions of Sexual Secrets in Eighteenth-Century Venereal Cases’, and Kristin Collins on ‘Rape and Manhood in Nineteenth-Century Caucasus’.

The CFP for the Towards a cultural history of the decorator conference.

The CFP for Which craft? Politics & aesthetics of handicraft.

ECRS – 22 February

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Please join us for the fourth session in the University of Edinburgh’s Eighteenth-Century Research Seminar series. The session will present new work in sensory history and aims to explore its place within eighteenth-century studies . Elisabeth Gernerd (University of Edinburgh), will present her paper ‘”Thrusts her arms into a muff”: The Sensory Position of Silk Muffs’, and William Tullett (King’s College London) will present his paper, ‘From Womb to Nose: Smell and the Performance of Gender in Eighteenth-Century England’.

All welcome. Seminars held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from 4:30-6pm, and are followed by a drinks reception. 

You can also follow the series on its twitter account @ECRS_Edinburgh. We’ll be live-tweeting the papers from that handle.

Materializing Gender in Eighteenth-Century Europe

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My chapter ‘Taste a-la-Mode: consuming foreignness, picturing gender’, has just been published in Jennifer Germann and Heidi Strobel’s edited volume Materializing Gender in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Ashgate/Routledge).

A description of the book is available below:

“Art history has enriched the study of material culture as a scholarly field. This interdisciplinary volume enhances this literature through the contributors’ engagement with gender as the conceptual locus of analysis in terms of femininity, masculinity, and the spaces in between. Collectively, these essays by art historians and museum professionals argue for a more complex understanding of the relationship between objects and subjects in gendered terms. The objects under consideration range from the quotidian to the exotic, including beds, guns, fans, needle paintings, prints, drawings, mantillas, almanacs, reticules, silver punch bowls, and collage. These material goods may have been intended to enforce and affirm gendered norms, however as the essays demonstrate, their use by subjects frequently put normative formations of gender into question, revealing the impossibility of permanently fixing gender in relation to material goods, concepts, or bodies. This book will appeal to art historians, museum professionals, women’s and gender studies specialists, students, and all those interested in the history of objects in everyday life.”

More information on the book, including some initial reviews, is available on the Routledge website.

Week in Review – 13 February

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This week my twitter feed has been full of historical valentines and love themed art objects, such as this ‘Lobster in Love’ valentine’s card from the Museum of London, and these digitised images from Arthur Freeling’s Flowers, Their Use and Beauty, Language and Sentiment (1857). Follow the hashtags #valentinesday #paintedlovers and #victorianvalentines to see more.

Other things that caught my eye this week:

Alun Whitley & Jennifer Evans’ call for chapters for their edited volume Framing the Face: New Perspectives on the History of Facial Hair. 

This blog post on wallpaper studies, complete with introductory bibliography.

Matt Lodder’s new article ‘Things of the sea’: iconographic continuities between tattooing and handicrafts in Georgian-era maritime culture‘.

The Pre-Raphaelites on Paper: Victorian Drawings from the Lanigan Collection exhibition.

Stephen Etheridge’s thoughtful post on whether you can be a ‘post-doctoral researcher’ without having an official post-doctoral position.

CFP for a special issue on Gothic Studies on the ‘Nautical Gothic’.

Mary Beard muses on why more women historians aren’t best-selling authors.

This talk and pop-up exhibition on  The Rise of the Literary Annual, Powerful Femininity, and Beautiful Books.

This conference on Chinese Wallpaper: Trade, Technique and Taste.

Frank Trentmann’s new book Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First.

The programme for LGBT History Month at the National Maritime Museum.

The National Archives’ creative workshop Out of the Archives: A zine workshop on 20th century women’s movements.

History of Art Research Seminar Series

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On 25 February I’ll be presenting research developed from my doctoral thesis on the relationship between needlework, painting and print culture as part of the University of Edinburgh’s History of Art Research Seminar Series. The title of the paper is ‘The Sister Arts: Needlework between Thread, Paint, and Print in Eighteenth-century Britain’, and further details can be found here.

The programme for the series as a whole can be found here.

Week in Review – 6 February

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Friendship book of Anne Wagner (1795-1834), New York Public Library.

Another week in review, another favourite from the Public Domain Review. However, I couldn’t help but include the incredible Friendship Book of Anne Wagner (1795-1834), held at the New York Public Library. These ‘Memorials of Friendship’ feature a range of dedicatory passages as well as a number of intricate mixed-media collages, some of which were made by the young Felicia Dorothea Browne (later Hemans). Thanks to its use of collage and affective nature, I’m keen to research the album as part of my new research project on the relationship between assemblage and identity, 1750-1900.

Other things that caught my eye this week included:

The forthcoming Gender Stereotypes in the Long Nineteenth Century Symposium at the University of Stirling.

The On Top of the World world history podcasts.

Two exciting funding initiatives from the Hakluyt Society for the History of Travel, Exploration and Global Encounters.

The Collecting, Exhibiting and Preserving in Museums of Applied Arts in the
Nineteenth Century conference.

The programme for the Photo Archives V. The Paradigm of Objectivity workshop.

This call for articles on ‘Gender in Victorian Popular Fiction, Art, and Culture,’ in Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies.